positivism


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positivism

A school of philosophy that rejects value judgements, metaphysics and theology and holds that the only path to reliable knowledge is that of scientific observation and experiment.

positivism,

n the notion that all desired information can be obtained through data that are physically measurable.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, according to the ontology and methodology of the positivism, this approach uses Physics methodology including "controlled tests" and "repeatable procedures", based on which every time "controlled tests" have a similar results.
The process of analogy in positivism approach requires that researcher makes a hypothesis based on a theory, which should be testable later for explaining a certain phenomenon.
To address the gaps persisted by the mainstream positivism in the explanation of the nature of law; the second section of this paper explains the integrated approach to law, mainly focusing on the Proposition ii.
However, the mainstream legal positivism has failed to characterize a legal system from the benchmark of the unity of LEV.
separability thesis essential to legal positivism, then it would have to
separability thesis need not be essential to legal positivism in order
It is thus already at the very first lines of the article published in 1964, before Dworkin's first direct attacks on Hart's positivism and long before the supposed radical shift in views that came with his turn to interpretivism, (7) that others concerned with the question "what is law?
Part III addresses the conflict between positivism and policy-oriented jurisprudence about policy as a criterion for legality.
Constitution from exilic incatenation will usher in the chaos and lawlessness of Positivism.
How were the traditional contributions of positivism, observation, and even empiricism itself to be upheld, given the decidedly nonobservational, inferential, and computational advancements in the areas of the very small (atomic theory, quantum mechanics) and the very large (relativity theory)?
Certainly, positivism still influences some social sciences, especially economics, in the sense that there is a conviction in the cumulative development of science.
The Eurocentric flavour of the separability-inseparability controversy suggests that both legal positivism and legal naturalism and their respective views on the relation between law and morality have been essentially distilled from the perspective and experiences of Europe.