positional vertigo


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Related to positional vertigo: Benign positional vertigo, Epley maneuver

vertigo

 [ver´tĭ-go]
a sensation of rotation or movement of one's self (subjective vertigo) or of one's surroundings (objective vertigo) in any plane. The term is sometimes used erroneously as a synonym for dizziness. Vertigo may result from diseases of the inner ear or may be due to disturbances of the vestibular centers or pathways in the central nervous system.
benign paroxysmal positional vertigo recurrent vertigo and nystagmus occurring when the head is placed in certain positions, usually not associated with lesions of the central nervous system.
benign positional vertigo (benign postural vertigo) benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
central vertigo that due to disorder of the central nervous system.
cerebral vertigo vertigo resulting from a brain lesion, such as in meningogenic labyrinthitis. Called also organic vertigo.
disabling positional vertigo constant vertigo or dysequilibrium and nausea in the upright position, without hearing disturbance or loss of vestibular function.
labyrinthine vertigo Meniere's disease.
organic vertigo cerebral vertigo.
peripheral vertigo vestibular vertigo.
positional vertigo that associated with a specific position of the head in space or with changes in position of the head in space.
vestibular vertigo vertigo due to disturbances of the vestibular centers or pathways in the central nervous system.

positional vertigo

vertigo occurring with a change in body position.

positional vertigo

a severe but brief episode of vertigo associated with a change of body position, as when a patient lies down. It may be caused by an injury or disease of the utricle. Also called postural vertigo. See also cupulolithiasis.

po·si·tion·al ver·ti·go

(pŏ-zish'ŏn-ăl vĕr'ti-gō)
Vertigo occurring with a change in body position.
References in periodicals archive ?
20,21] It is well known that some form of dizziness or unsteadiness is often present, but positional vertigo as an initial symptom is rare.
Combined horizontal and posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in three patients with head trauma.
Decreased serum vitamin D in idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a clinical entity characterized by acute, brief, paroxysmal attacks of rotational vertigo induced by head position changes.
Keywords: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Dix-Hallpike maneuvre, Epley maneuver, Post-maneuver neck restrictions.
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a form of dizziness characterized by short (typically lasting seconds) yet frequent attacks of vertigo associated with certain provocative movements (i.
A large population-based survey conducted using telephone interviews found that the rate of spontaneous rotatory vertigo is 67% while that of positional vertigo is 24% [20].
Here we report the gait patterns of 30 patients who were found to have positional vertigo.
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can also present acutely, although it is somewhat more likely to be recurrent.
Adverse effects of health anxiety on management of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular migraine and chronic subjective dizziness.
Clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in Taiwan: differences between young and senior age groups.
One of the most common dizziness disorders, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV, occurs when calcium crystals in the utricle, one of the structures comprising the vestibular system, break loose and stimulate sensory hair cells, causing mild to intense spinning sensations.