posh

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posh

adjective Referring to someone or something associated with, or aspiring to be associated with, the upper (socioeconomic) class in the UK.
References in periodicals archive ?
A WOMAN prison officer has been charged with misconduct in public office after allegations that she had sex with an inmate at one of Birmingham's poshest hotels.
The restaurant and take-away, based in Wolverhampton Road, Oldbury, near the junction with the Hagley Road, claims to offer diners the poshest fish and chips in Britain and has set out to recreate the traditional salt and vinegar essence of the seaside on the fringe of landlocked Birmingham.
The streets of London's poshest neighborhoods, such as Mayfair and Kensington, are swarmed with Paparazzi waiting to get the latest angle on a footballer or Glamour Girl.
After all the years of abuse the Grand National festival has taken over the years, I have to admit to feeling a little schadenfreude when I read the news about how badly behaved some people had been at what is supposed to be the poshest race meeting of them all.
Ever wondered what happens backstage at the poshest showbiz events?
It has the poshest setting of any pier: David Geffen's $425-a-night Malibu Beach Inn lies just to the north.
Riverview Boulevard is arguably still Bradenton's poshest address, and three new, side-by-side listings in the 3400 block prove why.
Thanks to Duncan, who describes himself as The Poshest Bloke In Northumberland, for his venerable tale.
The poshest turkey-to-go dinner in town can be had from the Hotel Bel-Air, 701 Stone Canyon Road, Bel-Air, for $350 (feeds six) with a 48-hour advance reservation needed.
BIRKDALE: Selworthy Road Birkdale's poshest residents debate whether Selworthy Road or nearby Sandringham Road consitute the poshest address in the area.
We know there will be a correction--but will it only affect the biggest cities and poshest suburbs where the latest outbreak of irrational exuberance has gone furthest?
To the east is Eaton Square, the poshest address in London, lined by houses of dukes and multi-millionaires, and down the King's Road, which leads out of the square to the west, is Chelsea, still then partly a working class area, in which Bohemians were starting a process of gentrification that has now utterly transformed the whole borough.