portal of entry


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portal of entry

the route by which an infectious agent enters the body, such as through nonintact skin.

por·tal of en·try

(pōr'tăl en'trē)
Refers to the process whereby a pathogen enters the body, gains access to susceptible tissues, and causes disease or infection (e.g., direct contact, ingestion, inhalation).

por·tal of en·try

(pōr'tăl en'trē)
Refers to the process whereby a pathogen enters the body, gains access to susceptible tissues, and causes disease or infection.

portal of entry,

n the area in which a microorganism enters the body. They may be cuts, lesions, injection sites, or natural body orifices.

portal

1. an avenue of entrance; porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.

portal-azygos anastomosis
a form of portacaval shunt with the portal vein bypassing the liver and emptying directly into the azygos vein.
portal biliary bacterial circulation
a continuous normal circulation of bacteria brought to the liver in the portal vein from the gut and excreted back into the gut via the biliary system.
portal canal
tissue space situated between three or more hepatic lobules; carries the blood and lymphatic vessels and connective tissue.
portal-caval
see portacaval.
portal circulation
circulation of blood from the capillaries of one organ to those of another; applied especially to the passage of blood from the gastrointestinal tract and spleen through the portal vein to the liver. See also circulatory system.
portal of entry
the pathway by which bacteria or other pathogenic agents gain entry to the body.
portal fibrosis
see biliary fibrosis.
portal hypertension
see portal obstruction.
portal obstruction
obstruction of portal venous blood flow through external pressure on the portal vein, by abscess or tumor or by hepatic fibrosis constricting the hepatic vascular bed, causes interference with digestion and absorption and eventually venous return so that ascites and diarrhea develop.
portal system
an arrangement by which blood collected from one set of capillaries passes through a large vessel or vessels and another set of capillaries before returning to the systemic circulation, as in the pituitary gland and liver.
Includes the hepatic portal system consisting of portal vein and its tributaries from the stomach, intestine, pancreas and spleen, the vessels into which the portal vein divides in the liver and the hepatic veins that enter into the caudal vena cava.
portal systemic shunt
see portacaval shunt.
portal triad
anatomically close association of interlobular bile duct, branches of hepatic artery and portal vein.
portal vascular anomalies
see portacaval anastomosis.
portal vein
a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the caudal mesenteric and splenic veins; at the porta hepatis, it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.
portal vein obstruction
acute, complete obstruction causes a syndrome similar to that of intestinal obstruction without signs suggesting liver involvement; partial occlusion causes shrinkage and eventual atrophy of the relevant section of the liver.
portal vein rupture
rare complication of epiploic foraminal herniation; sudden death from internal hemorrhage results.
portal venule absence
a congenital defect resulting in the development of multiple shunts within the liver, hepatoportal fibrosis and ascites, general immaturity and hepatic encephalopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
A cutaneous portal of entry was defined when the clinical manifestations (and the diagnosis) of IF were preceded by the occurrence of localized skin lesions (such as cellulitis at sites of onychomycosis and intertrigo) with positive culture for Fusarium spp.
They serve as the portal of entry into the health care system, providing access to quality, affordable care in a patient-centric manner.
Two-thirds of cases were notable for a cutaneous portal of entry of Fusarium spp.
The skin is the primary portal of entry for this virulent pathogen, which can cause disease with an inoculation of fewer than 50 organisms.
Because that wound can serve as a portal of entry or exit for HIV, someone infected with syphilis can more easily contract HIV infection and also readily pass the deadly virus on to another person.
The application as nasal spray instead of injection into the muscle has an advantage in that the immunization protection is stimulated directly at the virus' portal of entry.
Several researchers have postulated that the gills might be the portal of entry for CyHV-3 (17, 26-28); however, this hypothesis was recently refuted (29).