population genetics


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pop·u·la·tion ge·net·ics

the study of genetic influences on the components of cause and effect in the somatic characteristics of populations.

population genetics

n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of science that deals with the statistical analysis of the inheritance and prevalence of genes in populations and genetic divergence between populations.

population genetics

a branch of genetics that applies mendelian inheritance to groups and studies the frequency of alleles and genotypes in breeding populations. See also Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium principle.

pop·u·la·tion ge·net·ics

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn jĕ-net'iks)
The study of genetic influences on the components of cause and effect in the somatic characteristics of populations.

population genetics

the study of heredity at the population level, for example, gene frequencies, mating systems.

population

all of the animals in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. The population may also be defined in modes other than geography, e.g. the cow population, a species specification, the nocturnal bird population.

binomial population
see binomial population.
population cartogram
a map of populations.
case population
see case population.
closed population
e.g. closed herd or flock; a population into which no introductions are permitted, including artificial insemination or embryo transfer; the population is genetically and/or hygienically isolated.
comparison population
see comparison population.
contiguous p's
the populations are separated but have a common border. Some diseases are very difficult to restrain from spreading from one population to the next.
control population
see control population.
population density
see population density.
experimental population
the population in which the experiment, or trial, is being conducted.
finite population
one capable of total examination by census.
genetic population
see deme.
genetically defined population
one in which the ancestry of the animals in it is known.
population genetics
deals with the frequency of occurrence of inherited characteristics in a population.
infinite population
cannot be examined as a total population because they may never actually exist but are capable of statistical importance.
population limitation
restricting the growth of an animal population by desexing, by culling or by managemental means of interfering with reproduction.
population mean
the mean of the population.
population numbers
see population size (below).
open population
one in which immigration in and out is unrestrained.
parent population
the original population about which it is hoped to make some inferences by examination of a sample of its constituent members.
population proportion
the percentage of the population that has the subject characteristics.
population pyramid
a graphic presentation of the composition of a population with the largest group forming the baseline, the smallest at the apex.
population at risk
see risk population (below).
risk population
the population which is composed of animals that are exposed to the pathogenic agent under discussion and are inherently susceptible to it. Called also population at risk. High or special risk groups are those which have had more than average exposure to the pathogenic agent.
population size
actual counting of a total population, the census method, is not often possible in large animal populations. Alternatives are by various sampling techniques including area trapping, the trapping of all animals in an area, the capture-release-recapture method, the nearest neighbor and line transect methods,
The population size is expressed as the population present at a particular instant. Alternatively it can be expressed as an animal-duration expression when the population is a shifting one and it is desired to express the population size over a period (e.g. cow-day).
stable population
a population which has constant mortality and fertility rates, and no migration, therefore a fixed age distribution and constant growth rate.
target population
in epidemiological terms the population from which an experimenter wishes to draw an unbiased sample and make inferences about it.
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