almshouse

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almshouse

An institution created in the 1800s in the UK to house children, adults, the elderly, and the mentally ill, with no distinction among these groups in terms of services.
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Poorhouse concentrates on major music documentaries and represents selected producers.
After the Amendment Act was in place, someone elderly and infirm who applied for parish relief, like '"Poor old John'" Abdy in Emma (383), would have to leave his family and home to live in the poorhouse or get nothing.
Many others were children who had been living in--sometimes born in--county poorhouses.
The agency believed that this restriction on outdoor aid would stimulate people to make a "renewed effort to secure their own living" because no one would choose to live in the poorhouse if they had other alternatives.
It begins with a description of poor relief in Providence before the Dexter Asylum, before turning to an assessment of the historiography of the poorhouse, which attempts to answer the question: Why did new institutions supplant the system of outdoor relief, and how did these new almshouses impact social relations?
Rather than grim Bastilles, as the English working class referred to nineteenth-century workhouses, Wagner finds that poorhouses were humane institutions that adapted to their residents even as residents themselves shaped aspects of institutional life and exerted influence on poorhouse managers.
Though the frame of the story seems a little young, the "messages from the past" are more mature, ranging from highway robbery to a young, pregnant widow from Nowhere, being refused admittance to one poorhouse after another.
Backing Crouch to score first (8-1 Ladbrokes, William Hill) or at anytime (9-4 Skybet) would have been the road to the poorhouse.
The notes to Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk, for instance, chronicle the founding of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and its entanglement with the history of a local poorhouse.
The distinction was absolutely fundamental to the poorhouse project, (20) entailing detailed quantifications of both bodies and regimes, for providing an uncomfortable life for the able-bodied would, it was anticipated, prompt them to seek work.
Says Reiner Moritz, a veteran indie producer at Poorhouse Intl.