poor sleep hygiene

poor sleep hygiene

A general term for pre-sleep habits that are suboptimal and not conducive to proper rest, which can affect a person’s functioning during the day.

Aetiology
Excess alcohol, tobacco, meals or snacks immediately before sleep; sedentary lifestyle; daytime napping; bereavement; traumatic events and personal tragedies.

Management
Regular exercise, abstinence from abuse substances, stress reduction, meditation, autohypnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many things can cause insomnia, including unseen illness, medication side effects, alcohol or drug use, chronic pain, restless legs syndrome, sleep apnea, too much caffeine, migraines, and poor sleep hygiene.
Poor sleep hygiene may contribute to the development of sleep disturbances among people with MS.
It is generally regarded that poor sleep hygiene is not the primary cause of insomnia, although it may contribute to it (Halson, 2008).
The study found that poor sleep hygiene was associated with increased psychological strain, less engagement at work, and lower levels of self-control.
Table 10 Triggers to avoid Allergy Changes in gut permeability Obesity Oral disease (tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis) Poor diet Poor sleep hygiene Sedentary lifestyle Smoking Stress Vitamin D deficiency
A 2010 National Sleep Foundation (NSF) study found that a majority of Americans have poor sleep hygiene.
Movements during sleep through restless legs syndrome, poorer oxygen saturation, and poor sleep hygiene in general (e.
Sleep difficulties are often chalked up to poor sleep hygiene habits, which include such tips as a consistent bedtime and wakeup time, a cool and well-ventilated bedroom, and comfortable bedding.
1997; Medications may impair sleep Hauri, 2000 Lifestyle factors (Bootzin, Poor sleep hygiene (e.
1), (3-3) Sleep "characteristics" change with age, but several factors operate in the elderly, including poor sleep hygiene, inactivity, bereavements, sociobehavioral problems, and coexisting diseases, including medical and psychiatric problems.
For example, nighttime tossing and turning can indicate a need to adjust your sleep habits to the natural sleep changes that occur with aging, or it could reflect a medication issue, poor sleep hygiene, obstructive sleep apnea, or even depression.
The fact that a substantial portion of American children achieve such small amounts of sleep should be of concern in light of findings from prior studies suggesting associations between poor sleep hygiene and decreased cognitive and social functioning," they wrote.