polyuria


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Related to polyuria: polydipsia, polyphagia

polyuria

 [pol″e-u´re-ah]
excessive excretion of urine, such as with diabetes mellitus.

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yū'rē-ă),
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse and frequent micturition.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

/poly·uria/ (-ūr´e-ah) excessive secretion of urine.

polyuria

(pōl′ē-yo͝or′ē-ə)
n.
Excessive passage of urine, as in diabetes.

pol′y·u′ric adj.

polyuria

[pol′ēyoo͡r′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, polys + ouron, urine
the excretion of an abnormally large quantity of urine. Some causes of polyuria are diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, use of diuretics, excessive fluid intake, and hypercalcemia.

polyuria

Nephrology Excessive urination due to ↑ production

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yūr'ē-ă)
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse micturition; causes include diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, and hypercalcemia, but sometimes results from overhydration.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

The formation of abnormally large quantities of urine. See also POLYDIPSIA.

Polyuria

Excessive production of urine.

polyuria

pathological secretion of excess amounts of urine; due to either the presence of sugar in the urine (in diabetes mellitus) or the absence of antidiuretic hormone from the posterior pituitary (in diabetes insipidus); see polydipsia

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yūr'ē-ă)
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse and frequent micturition.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria (pol´ēyoor´ēə),

n the passage of an abnormally increased volume of urine. It may result from increased intake of fluids, inadequate renal function, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus or diabetes insipidus, diuresis of edema fluid, or ascites.

polyuria

the formation and excretion of a large volume of urine. A history of polyuria in an animal is as unreliable as a history of polydipsia. A quantitative assurance that polydipsia is present suggests an error of renal tubular efficiency either as a result of toxic damage or an absence of the pituitary gland's antidiuretic hormone.

compensatory polyuria
see physiological polyuria (below).
pathological polyuria
that caused by a disease of the kidney or disorder elsewhere in the body, e.g. diabetes mellitus or liver failure.
pharmacological polyuria
is caused by administered fluids or medication, such as glucocorticoids or diuretics.
physiological polyuria
the result of increased fluid intake; called also compensatory polyuria (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Factors contributing to the degree of polyuria in a patient with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.
This osmotic effect results in decreasing the reabsorption of liquid that may cause the appearance of polyuria resulting in dehydration and, consequently, polydipsia (33,39).
The most important factors leading to nocturnal polyuria in children are as follows (20):
Polyuria and polydipsia suggested diabetes insipidus.
A cluster of symptoms is classically associated with T1DM: polyuria, polydipsia and polyphagia, accompanied by fatigue, nausea and blurred vision.
Low dose oral desmopressin for nocturnal polyuria in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized study.
Other side effects included headache more than 1 month after surgery (six patients), agitation in reaction to amplitude increase (three), dizziness (three), polyuria (two), and weight gain, buzzing in the ears, and insomnia (one each).
The polyuria that occurs during HHS often causes hypokalemia.
Greek physician Aretus the Cappadocian who explained that patients with this disease had polyuria and "passed water like a siphon'.
This abundantly illustrated authoritative text addresses the many facets of understanding, diagnosing, and treating pathologies, and includes algorithms for common problems such as alopecia, polyuria, and weight loss.
Key words: dog, cat, polyuria, polydipsia, diagnosis.