polyuria


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Related to polyuria: polydipsia, polyphagia

polyuria

 [pol″e-u´re-ah]
excessive excretion of urine, such as with diabetes mellitus.

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yū'rē-ă),
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse and frequent micturition.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

/poly·uria/ (-ūr´e-ah) excessive secretion of urine.

polyuria

(pōl′ē-yo͝or′ē-ə)
n.
Excessive passage of urine, as in diabetes.

pol′y·u′ric adj.

polyuria

[pol′ēyoo͡r′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, polys + ouron, urine
the excretion of an abnormally large quantity of urine. Some causes of polyuria are diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, use of diuretics, excessive fluid intake, and hypercalcemia.

polyuria

Nephrology Excessive urination due to ↑ production

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yūr'ē-ă)
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse micturition; causes include diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, and hypercalcemia, but sometimes results from overhydration.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

The formation of abnormally large quantities of urine. See also POLYDIPSIA.

Polyuria

Excessive production of urine.

polyuria

pathological secretion of excess amounts of urine; due to either the presence of sugar in the urine (in diabetes mellitus) or the absence of antidiuretic hormone from the posterior pituitary (in diabetes insipidus); see polydipsia

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yūr'ē-ă)
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse and frequent micturition.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria (pol´ēyoor´ēə),

n the passage of an abnormally increased volume of urine. It may result from increased intake of fluids, inadequate renal function, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus or diabetes insipidus, diuresis of edema fluid, or ascites.

polyuria

the formation and excretion of a large volume of urine. A history of polyuria in an animal is as unreliable as a history of polydipsia. A quantitative assurance that polydipsia is present suggests an error of renal tubular efficiency either as a result of toxic damage or an absence of the pituitary gland's antidiuretic hormone.

compensatory polyuria
see physiological polyuria (below).
pathological polyuria
that caused by a disease of the kidney or disorder elsewhere in the body, e.g. diabetes mellitus or liver failure.
pharmacological polyuria
is caused by administered fluids or medication, such as glucocorticoids or diuretics.
physiological polyuria
the result of increased fluid intake; called also compensatory polyuria (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Loss of vitamin D receptor produces polyuria by increasing thirst.
When the desmopressin was discontinued, the polyuria did not worsen, suggesting a response to endogenous antidiuretic hormone.
The defect is both of aquaporin-2 on the luminal surface of the collecting duct and of aquaporin-3 on the basal lateral membrane, producing a severe defect in aquaporin production that parallels the lithium-induced polyuria (Marples, Christensen, Christensen, Ottosen, & Nielsen, 1995).
The symptom profile of those affected matched that of the patient and included the presence, at a significant level, of dysuria (painful or difficult urination), polyuria (copious and hence frequent urination), dyspnea (shortness of breath, difficult or labored breathing), chest pain, irritability, fatigue, headache, and dizziness (Baker et al.
4] However, before water deprivation begins, the patient should have documentable polyuria (urine volume [greater than] 2.
Impact of desmopressin on nocturia due to nocturnal polyuria in men with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH).
A seventeen-month-old male infant with severe malnutrition and developmental retardation was found to have polyuria and polydipsia in the follow-up.
2d 809 [Miss 1968]), a physician was found liable for misdiagnosing his patient's weight loss, polyuria, and polydipsia as multiple sclerosis, and for failing to attend to him for 29 hours after he was hospitalized with diabetic ketoacidosis.
A seven-year-old Yemeni male patient presented to the emergency room with polyuria, polydepsia, weight loss, nocturnal enuresis and decreased activity for 7 days duration and history of viral infection 4 weeks prior to the presentation.
Type 1 diabetes typically occurs in children and young people, and usually presents with a dramatic onset of weight loss, polyuria and thirst.
Polyuria and polydipsia suggested diabetes insipidus.
Resultant polyuria increases the risk of hypovolemia and further hypoxic injury to the kidney.