syndesis

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Related to polysyndeton: polyptoton, epistrophe

syndesis

 [sin´dĕ-sis]

syndesis

/syn·de·sis/ (sin´dĕ-sis)

syndesis

[sin′dəsis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, dein, to bind
surgical fixation of a joint. Also called arthrodesis.

ar·thro·de·sis

(ahr-thrō'dē-sis)
The stiffening of a joint by operative means.
Synonym(s): artificial ankylosis, syndesis.
[arthro- + G. desis, a binding together]

syndesis

1. arthrodesis.
2. synapsis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figures of repetition also abound: polysyndeton, synonymy, anaphora.
To interpret the accumulation of the coordinating conjunction and in this case as conveying Jake's enthusiasm is certainly debatable, as are other interpretations of the effects of polysyndeton in other passages.
As Demetrius observed about polysyndeton, "repetition of the same connective" heightens "the impression of large numbers" (63).
His final sentence as peroration combined Classical polysyndeton with klimax or scala for grandeur derived by increasing the number of letters or syllables in successive words lauding "liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable
Here the protagonist bemoans--and not with movingly plangent rhythm enhanced by anaphora, polysyndeton, and zeugma--the precarious nature of her efforts to make ends meet and run a family.
This text demonstrates, first, some typical aspects of the Puritan sermon - its appeal to reason (logos), for instance, and illustrates some rhetorical and stylistic devices that we would expect in sermons, such as dialogismus, Biblical parataxis and polysyndeton, epicrisis, cataplexis, categoria, dehortatio, adhortatio, oraculum, and protrope.
In addition to these, further stylistic features we examine that characterize Huck's speech specifically include run-on sentences, polysyndeton, transitional words and phrases, linear, right-branching syntax, parelcon, and humorous similes.
Polysyndeton can be used to indicate not only a series of things but can emphasize an abundance either of objects or of events passing.
Polysyndeton using and is frequent in the Bible (46,227 times according to the makers of Trivial Pursuit), and some writers (for example, Poe and Melville) have used polysyndeton to give passages a Biblical "flavor" - to suggest that what they are writing has the weight of Biblical pronouncement and truth.
He also notes that polysyndeton can slow down a passage, "thereby adding dignity to what we say, much like the slow motion of a ceremony" (13).
Rather than adding a sense of dignity to prose, polysyndeton can sometimes have the opposite effect - that is, it can create a sense of the colloquial.