polyploid


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Related to polyploid: autopolyploid, autopolyploidy

polyploid

 [pol´e-ploid]
1. characterized by polyploidy.
2. an individual or cell characterized by polyploidy.

pol·yp·loid

(pol'ē-ployd),
Characterized by or pertaining to polyploidy.

polyploid

(pŏl′ē-ploid′)
adj.
Having one or more extra sets of chromosomes: a polyploid species; a polyploid cell.
n.
An organism with more than two sets of chromosomes.

pol′y·ploi′dy n.

polyploid

[pol′əploid]
Etymology: Gk, polys + plous, times
1 n, an individual, organism, strain, or cell that has more than twice the haploid number of chromosomes characteristic of the species. The multiple of the haploid number is denoted by the appropriate prefix, as in triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, hexaploid, heptaploid, octaploid, and so on. Polyploidy is rare in animals, producing individuals that are abnormal in appearance and usually infertile. It is common in plants, however; such plants generally are larger, have larger cells, and are hardier than diploid plants.
2 adj, also called polyploidic. pertaining to such an individual, organism, strain, or cell. Compare aneuploid. polyploidy, n.

polyploid

adjective Referring to polyploidy, see there.

pol·y·ploid

(pol'i-ployd)
Characterized by or pertaining to polyploidy.

polyploid

Having more than twice the normal HAPLOID number of chromosomes. See also DIPLOID.

polyploid

  1. (of cells or organisms) having three or more complete sets of chromosomes.
  2. an individual or cell of this type. see TRIPLOID, TETRAPLOID.

polyploid

1. characterized by polyploidy.
2. an individual or cell characterized by polyploidy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of meiotic behavior in polyploid accessions of Paspalum (Plicatula group).
The scientists' exhaustive survey of published phylogenetic and genomic data also shows that plant lineages starting with a polyploid ancestor appear to be no more successful at spawning species than diploid plants, which have two sets of chromosomes.
Being a polyploid species in some instances, Panicum repens may be more adaptable than taxa with which it is in direct competition.
1999) that most probably represent wild grasses or unusually large polyploid grains.
Similarly when new species evolve within ecosystems exhibiting high degrees of "niche-packing," they are very rarely successful, but when they are, they usually have very highly specialized adaptations, like polyploid plants.
Allozyme polymorphism in diploid and polyploid population of Galium.
Polyploid organisms have more than two copies of their chromosomes and so can evolve generation to generation, a key worry for organic consumers seeking genetic purity in their foodstuffs.
The clustering of genes associated with the G2/M transition point suggests that in the rat, the polyploid cells arrested at G2/M are those that are proceeding through the cell cycle.
Understanding of the gene action will introduce some knowledge of how the nucleus and cytoplasm interact in a polyploid species.
Thus, Miller suggests that if a species happens to become polyploid, it avoids the ills of inbreeding if it also evolves gender dimorphism.