polyphenism


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polyphenism

(pol-ē-fē'nizm),
Ability of a single genome to produce alternative phenotypes in response to environmental clues.
[poly- + phenotype + -ism]

polyphenism

the presence of several phenotypes in a population that are not the result of genetic differences.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adaptations to hazardous seasonal conditions: dormancy, migration, and polyphenism, pp.
Evolution of a polyphenism by genetic accommodation.
Some specific subjects discussed are phase polyphenism in locusts, oviposition site selection by a mosquito in response to its predators, and a case study of egg size plasticity in a seed-feeding beetle.
Effects of photoperiod, temperature and melatonin on nymphal development, polyphenism and reproduction in Halyomorpha halys (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae).
Phylogenetic perspectives on the evolution of locust phase polyphenism.
Effects of photoperiod, temperature and melatonin on nymphal development, polyphenism and reporduction in Halyomorpha halys (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae).
glaucus may experience a seasonal polyphenism, which could alter our interpretations of the data sets.
The environmental and genetic control of seasonal polyphenism in larval color and its adaptive significance in a swallowtail butterfly.
2008), floral color changes in response to insect pollination (Paige & Whitham 1985), and seasonal polyphenisms (Hazel 2002) can be quantified.
Butterflies with multiple annual generations that emerge over the span of several months or occur throughout the year often exhibit seasonal polyphenism (Shapiro 1976).
Polyphenism among butterflies results from interactions of seasonally dynamic environmental variables, including temperature, photoperiod, and perhaps humidity and precipitation acting alone, in concert, or as redundant mechanisms (Shapiro 1977, 1978b, 1984; Smith 1991; Windig et al.
The extension of seasonal polyphenism to genital morphology is virtually unknown among butterflies (but see Scudder 1889; Reinhardt 1969 cited by Shapiro 1978a; Windig & Lammar 1999).