polypharmacy


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

polypharmacy

 [pol″e-fahr´mah-se]
1. the administration of many drugs together.
2. administration of excessive medication.

pol·y·phar·ma·cy

(pol'ē-far'mă-sē),
The administration of multiple drugs at the same time.
See also: shotgun prescription.

polypharmacy

/poly·phar·ma·cy/ (-fahr´mah-se)
1. administration of many drugs together.
2. administration of excessive medication.

polypharmacy

(pŏl′ē-fär′mə-sē)
n.
The practice of prescribing multiple medications for an individual patient, especially excessively, for a single disease.

polypharmacy

[-fär′məsē]
the use of a number of different drugs, possibly prescribed by different health care providers and filled in different pharmacies, by a patient who may have one or several health problems.

polypharmacy

Therapeutics The use of mutiple drugs to treat one or a limited number of conditions; it is most common in elderly Pts. See Therapeutic drug monitoring.

pol·y·phar·ma·cy

(pol'ē-fahr'mă-sē)
The administration of many drugs at the same time.

polypharmacy

A mildly facetious term for the generally disapproved practice of prescribing several different drugs to one person at the same time. Polypharmacy increases the risk of unwanted side effects and of dangerous interactions between different drugs.

polypharmacy

simultaneous use of several prescription-only medicines

polypharmacy,

n the practice of prescribing multiple drugs to patients suffering from more than one malady.

pol·y·phar·ma·cy

(pol'ē-fahr'mă-sē)
Administration of multiple drugs simultaneously.

polypharmacy,

n the prescription or dispensation of unnecessarily numerous or complex medicines.

polypharmacy

1. the administration of many drugs together.
2. administration of excessive medication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polypharmacy was reduced with one out of five patients being prescribed fewer medications after receiving GeneSight testing.
According to these guidelines, polypharmacy is optimal only for resistant patients and during antipsychotic switching periods (6,7,8).
POLYPHARMACY Polypharmacy is remarkably prevalent among older adults in the United States.
The ultimate goal of deprescribing is to manage polypharmacy and improve patient outcomes (Thompson & Farrell, 2013).
The rate of polypharmacy more than tripled during the course of the study, Dr.
Therefore, our primary aim was to eliminate opioid overuse and reduce polypharmacy in our inpatients.
Conventionally defined as the long-term use of five or more medications concurrently, polypharmacy can also mean the inappropriate use of multiple medications.
This short summary provides an overview of the implications of frailty, comorbidities and polypharmacy on the management of LUTS in older adults.
The report looked at six areas that contribute to unnecessary costs: medication nonadherence, delayed evidence-based treatment practice, misuse of antibiotics, medication errors, suboptimal use of generics, and mismanaged polypharmacy in older adults.
Polypharmacy is a term used to describe an individual's use of multiple medications.
It is, however, a useful adjunct to SAMF in helping to avoid problems arising from polypharmacy.
Moreover, our findings indicate that pharmacological interventions for multiple musculoskeletal diseases make a remarkable contribution to the polypharmacy in elderly.