polynomial

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polynomial

(pŏl′ē-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or consisting of more than two names or terms.
n.
1. A taxonomic designation consisting of more than two terms.
2. Mathematics
a. An algebraic expression consisting of one or more summed terms, each term consisting of a constant multiplier and one or more variables raised to nonnegative integral powers. For example, x2 - 5x + 6 and 2p3q + y are polynomials. Also called multinomial.
b. An expression of two or more terms.

polynomial

a relationship between two variables such that y = a + bx + cx2 + ... qxn. A straight line is y = a + bx. Any curve can be approximated with a polynomial formula.
References in periodicals archive ?
ii) As mentioned in [9, Lemma 3], the maximum vertex cover problem in bipartite graphs is polynomially equivalent to the densest k-subgraph problem in complements of bipartite graphs.
8 dS m-1 but at 12 dS m-1 increased greater than control while in root gradually decreased polynomially with R2= 0.
Thus, [PHI] is uniformly polynomially trichotmic with the polynomial trichotomy constant [alpha] = 2.
3) If A is polynomially generated by a set S, then [(e.
Finally, it should be noted that the techniques used in this article could be applied to a general polynomially self-localized basis in the abstract sense of [5], where a basis is called self-localized if its Gramian matrix presents certain off-diagonal decay.
Polynomially bounded ellipsoid algorithms for convex quadratic programming.
Note that this problem is similar to the polynomially solvable instances consider in Bruno et al.
For 1-d CA, if one restricts attention to a polynomially bounded version of CREP (i.
This procedure has polynomial time complexity, since finding the maximum independent set of an overlap graph has been shown by Gavril [1973] to be polynomially solvable in time O(|[E.
Board (1994) derives a similar result for agents whose computational resources are polynomially bounded in the relevant parameters.
In contrast, complexity grows only polynomially as we increase the number of user-defined predicates for a bounded number of relations in the query where they occur.
The most common way to show that a problem is NP-complete is to show that it can be polynomially reduced to another problem that is already known to be NP-complete.