polymorphonuclear leukocyte


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Related to polymorphonuclear leukocyte: Polymorphonuclear cells

leukocyte

 [loo´ko-sīt]
a type of blood cell that lacks hemoglobin and is therefore colorless. Leukocytes are larger in size and fewer in number than erythrocytes; normally the blood has about 8000 of them per mm3. In contrast to erythrocytes, leukocytes can move about under their own power with ameboid movement. Their chief functions are to act as scavengers and to help fight infections. Called also white cell or corpuscle and white blood cell or corpuscle. adj., adj leukocyt´ic.

Leukocytes may be classified in two main groups: the granular leukocytes are the basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and the nongranular leukocytes are the lymphocytes and monocytes. About 63 per cent of all leukocytes are neutrophils; 2.5 per cent are eosinophils; and the remaining types constitute less than 1 per cent each.

Leukocytes are actively engaged in the destruction or neutralization of invading microorganisms and are quickly transported to the vicinity of infection or inflammation, so that they can move through the blood vessel wall to reach the site of injury. For this reason, their life span in the blood is usually very short. When infection is present their numbers are greatly increased and they also become more mobile and move back and forth between the blood, lymph, and tissues. The granulocytes and monocytes are phagocytic, swallowing or ingesting the foreign particles with which they come in contact. During the process of phagocytosis the phagocytes themselves are destroyed. The two types of lymphocytes involved in immunity are B lymphocytes (B cells), which play a role in humoral immunity, and T lymphocytes (T cells), which are important in cell-mediated immunity. Plasma cells are activated B cells that secrete antibodies. Monocytes are also involved in some immune processes.
Types of leukocytes.
agranular l's nongranular leukocyte.
basophilic leukocyte basophil (def. 2).
eosinophilic leukocyte eosinophil.
granular l's leukocytes containing abundant granules in the cytoplasm, including neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Called also granulocyte.
neutrophilic leukocyte neutrophil (def. 2).
nongranular l's leukocytes without specific granules in the cytoplasm, including lymphocytes and monocytes. Called also agranular leukocytes.
polymorphonuclear leukocyte any fully developed, segmented granular leukocyte whose nuclei contain multiple lobes joined by filamentous connections, especially a neutrophil.

pol·y·mor·pho·nu·cle·ar leu·ko·cyte (PMN),

, polynuclear leukocyte
common term for granulocyte or granulocytic leukocyte; the term includes basophilic, eosinophilic, and neutrophilic leukocytes, but is usually used especially with reference to the neutrophilic leukocytes.

polymorphonuclear leukocyte,

a white blood cell containing a segmented lobular nucleus; an eosinophil, basophil, or neutrophil. See also granulocyte.

pol·y·mor·pho·nu·cle·ar leu·ko·cyte

, polynuclear leukocyte (pol'ē-mōr'fō-nū'klē-ăr lū'kō-sīt, pol'ē-nū'klē-ăr)
Common term for granulocyte or granulocytic leukocyte; includes basophilic, eosinophilic, and neutrophilic leukocytes, but generally used with special reference to the neutrophilic leukocytes.

pol·y·mor·pho·nu·cle·ar leu·ko·cyte

, polynuclear leukocyte (pol'ē-mōr'fō-nū'klē-ăr lū'kō-sīt, pol'ē-nū'klē-ăr)
Common term for granulocyte or granulocytic leukocyte; includes basophilic, eosinophilic, and neutrophilic leukocytes, but generally used with special reference to the neutrophilic leukocytes.

leukocyte

a white blood cell capable of ameboid movement, whose chief function is to protect the body against microorganisms causing disease and which comprise: granulocytes (basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils), nongranulocytes (lymphocytes, monocytes) and thrombocytes (platelets).

bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency
lethal hematological defect inherited as a recessive trait in Holstein cattle; characterized by poor growth, recurrent infection and poor responsivity to standard treatments in calves from 2 to 8 weeks of age. Profound neutrophilia. Death supervenes before two years of age. Called also BLAD.
canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency
an autosomal recessive disease in Irish setters. Neutrophils lack CD11/CD18 adhesion proteins. Affected dogs have a marked neutrophilia and recurrent bacterial infections from an early age.
leukocyte count
tabulation of the numbers and kinds of leukocytes in a blood sample.
endothelial leukocyte
leukocyte functional antigens
a group of cell surface antigens involved in intracellular adhesion.
granular l's
granulocytes; leukocytes containing abundant granules (lysosomes) in their cytoplasm, including neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils.
leukocyte migration-inhibition factor
a lymphokine elaborated by activated T or B lymphocytes that inhibits polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration.
polymorphonuclear leukocyte
any of the fully developed, segmented cells of the granulocyte series, especially a neutrophil, whose nuclei contain three or more lobes joined by filamentous connections.
References in periodicals archive ?
Churg et al[17] and Segal et al[19] reported cases of SLE with immune complex-associated pulmonary hemorrhage that showed primarily alveolar hemorrhage without alveolar wall inflammation, but the authors stated that rare, widely scattered foci of inflammation of the alveolar walls by polymorphonuclear leukocytes were present.
Subsequent damage to the endothelium is followed by endothelial-cell activation and perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, resulting in inflammatory vasculitis of dermal vessels, the histopathologic hallmark of rickettsial disease, and possibly thrombosis (23).
Effects of HBO on rates of bacterial clearance within infected wounds and other tissue has been largely attributed to restoration of function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in wounds.
Microscopic examination revealed an intense inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of lymphocytes, rare polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and epithelioid histiocytes forming ill-defined granulomas.
This role may be especially important therapeutically when the function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes is impaired or inadequate, rendering patients more susceptible to gram- negative bacterial sepsis.
PMN]) of lavaged polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and as the ratio ([r.
The lipopolysaccharide layer, due to its thick, gelatinous nature, also confers resistance to phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and protects K.
The differential count revealed 85% polymorphonuclear leukocytes, 9% lymphocytes, 3% monocytes, 3% bands, and 4+ rouleaux forms.
This abnormality is described as a hyposegmentation of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes with chromatin condensation.

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