polymer


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polymer

 [pol´ĭ-mer]
a compound, usually of high molecular weight, formed by combination of simpler molecules (monomers).

pol·y·mer

(pol'i-mĕr),
A substance of high molecular weight, made up of a chain of repeated units sometimes called "mers."
See also: biopolymer.
[see -mer (1)]

polymer

/poly·mer/ (pol´ĭ-mer) a compound, usually of high molecular weight, formed by the combination of simpler molecules (monomers); it may be formed without formation of any other product (addition p.) or with simultaneous elimination of water or other simple compound (condensation p.) .
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The polymer cellulose consists of linked repeating units of the monomer β-d-glucose.

polymer

[pol′imər]
Etymology: Gk, polys + meros, part
a compound formed by combining or linking a number of monomers, or small molecules. A polymer may be composed of many units of more than one type of monomer (a copolymer) or of many units of the same monomer (a homopolymer).

pol·y·mer

(pol'i-mĕr)
A substance of high molecular weight, made up of a chain of repeated units sometimes called "mers."
See also: -mer (1)

polymer

A chain molecule made up of repetitions of smaller chemical units or molecules called monomers. Polysaccharides, for instance, are long chains made up of repeated units of simpler monosaccharide sugars. Proteins are polymers of AMINO ACIDS. Polymerization is the process of causing many similar or identical small chemical groups to link up to form a long chain. From Greek, poly , many and meros , a part.

polymer

a compound of high molecular weight formed of long chains of repeating units (MONOMERS).

Polymer

A substance formed by joining smaller molecules. For example, plastic, acrylic, cellulose acetate, cellulose propionate, nylon, etc.

polymer

high-molecular-weight compound; formed as a chain of repeated base units

polymer (pˑ·l·mer),

n compound that comprises several repeating units of monomers. See also monomer.

pol·y·mer

(pol'i-mĕr)
Substance of high molecular weight, made up of a chain of repeated units sometimes called "mers."

polymer (pol´emur),

n a longchain hydrocarbon. In dentistry, the polymer is supplied as a powder to be mixed with the monomer for fabrication of appliances and restorations.

polymer

a compound, usually of high molecular weight, formed by combination of simpler molecules (monomers).

polymer-fume fever
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers begin by attaching a chemical group to a monomer, the individual unit of a polymer chain.
Polymers are widely used in the electronics industry and they are fundamental components of both manufacturing processes and final products, according to Rapra.
Epolene G-3003 and G-3015 function as coupling agents to improve impact strength in highly filled polymers such as polyolefins and nylon polymers.
TOF) were limiting factors to quantitative synthetic polymer mass spectrometry.
But new ones form to hold the polymers in the "stressed out" state.
With more commercial applications than any other supplier, Pavilion Technologies is a recognized leader in delivering MPC technology to the polymer industry.
Symposia focusing on emerging technologies in polymers will be featured on Thursday, August 10.
SPIN SPECS Electrospinning starts with a syringe filled with a polymer solution.
The use of polymers in medical technology continues to grow and provides high value business opportunities.
Session 7 on Polymer Processing for Medical Manufacturing will include the following presentation: "Innovative polymer processing technologies for medical and drug delivery devices manufacturing," Simone Maccagnan, Gimac Microextruders, Italy.
Douglas, also of NIST, and their colleagnes blended various amounts of the nanotubes into polymer samples.
Volume I is concerned with the fundamentals of chemical structure and principles of synthesis of macromolecules: constitution, configuration, conformation, polymerization equilibria, polymerization mechanisms (ionic, coordination, free-radical, step reactions, including solid-state and biochemical polymerizations), polymer reactions, and strategies for defined polymer architectures.