polymenorrhea


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polymenorrhea

 [pol″e-men″o-re´ah]
abnormally frequent menstruation.

pol·y·men·or·rhe·a

(pol'ē-men'ō-rē'ă), Do not confuse this word with hypermenorrhea.
Occurrence of menstrual cycles of greater than usual frequency.
[poly- + G. mēn, month, + rhoia, flow]

polymenorrhea

/poly·men·or·rhea/ (-men″ah-re´ah) abnormally frequent menstruation.

polymenorrhea

an abnormally frequent recurrence of the menstrual cycle. Also called polymenia.

pol·y·men·or·rhe·a

(pol'ē-men'ŏr-ē'ă)
Occurrence of menstrual cycles of greater than usual frequency.
Synonym(s): polymenorrhoea.
[poly- + G. mēn, month, + rhoia, flow]

polymenorrhea (pˈ·lē·me·nō·rēˑ·),

n disorder in which menstrual cycles are abnormally frequent and brief in duration,
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of 10 hyperthyroid patients having menstrual irregularities 6 (60%) had oligomenorrhea whereas 4 (40%) had polymenorrhea.
Among 52 occupationally exposed lead battery plant and capacitor factory workers, female lead-exposed workers showed a significantly higher prevalence of polymenorrhea and prolonged and abnormal menstruation than did a control group of 62 women who were randomly sampled workers in administrative or non-lead-production departments (Tang and Zhu 2003).
Conway in 1989 found that 75-80 Percent of women with P C O Shadamen orrheaandoligomenorrhea while 4-14 Percent patients had polymenorrhea, menorrhagia and dysfunctional uterine bleeding 16.
A large proportion of adolescent girls suffer from various gynecological problems, particularly menstrual irregularities such as menorrhagia, polymenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and dysmenorrhea.
Exclusion criteria included significant coagulation issues, endocrinopathy, ocular disease, pregnancy or lactation, endometrial abnormalities, cervical cancer, anovulatory dysfunctional uterine bleeding, metrorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, and polymenorrhea.
Some women with PCOS have polymenorrhea, or periods that are too frequent.
Current menstrual disturbances, including secondary amenorrhea (cycle intervals of [greater than]3 months), oligomenorrhea (cycle intervals of 36 days to 3 months), or polymenorrhea (cycle intervals of [less than]25 days) were reported by 20% of the diabetic women but only 7% of controls.
Contraceptive pills users, lactating women, and cases with history of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular abnormalities, psychiatric illness, irregular periods, heavy dysmenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, polymenorrhea, and relevant pathology were excluded from this study.
Polymenorrhea was the most common abnormality in tubectomized subjects (32%), while, in nontubectomized subjects, it was menorrhagia, making a total of 25% of all cases [Table 2, Figure 1].