polygraph

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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

/poly·graph/ (pol´e-graf) an apparatus for simultaneously recording blood pressure, pulse, and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as a lie detector.

polygraph

(pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. poly·graphed, poly·graphing, poly·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.

polygraph

[pol′ē·graf]
Etymology: Gk, polys + graphein, to write
an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as lie detector.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

polygraph

Lie detector A device designed to detect deception by evaluating physiologic responses to various spoken questions, measuring and recording changes in electrical and mechanical impulses in various parameters–eg, bp, respiratory rate, galvanic skin reflex

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

An instrument that simultaneously records changes in various physiological parameter such as pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and skin resistance changes from sweating. These sensitively reflect alterations in the emotions and the device is used to detect deception in answers to questions. A ‘lie detector’.

polygraph

an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The core technology of the polygraph is called "AI brain.
And Markowitz also points out that, just like the polygraph, CVSA analysis is not admissible in court as evidence of guilt.
Eye tracking promises to cost substantially less, require one-fifth of the time currently needed for examinations, require no attachment to the subject being tested, be available in any language and be administered by technicians rather than qualified polygraph examiners.
The polygraph continues to track my vital statistics as the test continuesC*
We are members of the National Polygraph Association, the American Polygraph Association and the British and European Polygraph Association, working to their professional and ethical standards," he said.
Examples of the types of issues that are appropriate for a polygraph examination in the securities context are 1) whether the purchase of a specific security was authorized; 2) whether the sale of a specific security was authorized; 3) whether the broker represented that a specific investment had no risk; or 4) whether the broker explained the difference between mutual fund "A" shares and "B" shares.
This is a necessary and important protection for rape victims in Illinois and throughout the country and hopefully will lead to an investigative environment where law enforcement not only refrains from requiring rape victims to take polygraph exams, but also doesn't request, pressure or intimidate victims to do so.
Notwithstanding the trenchant criticism above, polygraphs were used to some apparent effect in a recent case in Western Australia.
Thus, while polygraphs measure physiological responses that stem from brain activity, neuroimagery directly assesses the neuronal activity itself.
The story said the panel found the science behind polygraphs dubious and noted that a polygraph test is not admissible in court as evidence.
Machines resembling polygraphs were seen in space-age Russia only in spy movies, when captured KGB agents routinely outsmarted them.