polygraph

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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

/poly·graph/ (pol´e-graf) an apparatus for simultaneously recording blood pressure, pulse, and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as a lie detector.

polygraph

(pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. poly·graphed, poly·graphing, poly·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.

polygraph

[pol′ē·graf]
Etymology: Gk, polys + graphein, to write
an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as lie detector.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

polygraph

Lie detector A device designed to detect deception by evaluating physiologic responses to various spoken questions, measuring and recording changes in electrical and mechanical impulses in various parameters–eg, bp, respiratory rate, galvanic skin reflex

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

An instrument that simultaneously records changes in various physiological parameter such as pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and skin resistance changes from sweating. These sensitively reflect alterations in the emotions and the device is used to detect deception in answers to questions. A ‘lie detector’.

polygraph

an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, I would like to return to the idea of a polygraphic historiography, as a way to reflect more explicitly on what I have tried to accomplish above.
The upper hook of each aortic ring was attached to a force displacement transducer (BIOPAC) through a silk suture and changes in isometric force were recorded on a polygraphic system (BIOPAC software, USA).
POLYANDROUS no Andrews singing sis POLYGRAPHIC a birdy tattle-tale POLYSYLLABIC see Polyglottal POLYGRANTA a fondness for pomegranate seeds POLYALCOHOL booze for birds POLYCENTRIC a parrot turns into a penny POLYGON she flew away POLYGLOTTAL swears in many tongues POLYPHONOUS a birdy phone phreak POLYUNSATURATED never goes out in the rain POLYMORPHOUS a sleepy one, or shape shitter POLYCARBONATE the parrot ate the carbon copy POLYGENE cowboy singer Autry's parrot POLYNOMIAL she didn't get any food
Polygraphic recordings of infants aged 4-19 weeks taken between January 1977 and January 2000 showed that 75% of the 40 infants who later died of SIDS had obstructive sleep apnea, compared with 42% of the 607 gender- and age-matched controls (Am.
The law regarding consequences of a peace officer's refusal to submit to polygraphic examinations was amended to provide that it will now be voluntary rather than mandatory, for an officer, against whom an allegation of misconduct is made, to submit to a polygraphic examination concerning such activities.
It is exceedingly surprising that another polygraphic Egyptian Sufi and devotee of Ibn al-[Arabian.
Thus Bhai Vir Singh (1872-1957), a polygraphic scholar from the Sikh urban intellectual elite and a figurehead of the Sikh reformism advocated by the Singh Sabha,(8) wrote in his collection Dewdrops (1921) a poem entitled "Ranjha the Unique" whose message is clearly Sikh:(9)
14) Sayyid Qutb, Milestones (Malaysia: Polygraphic Press, 1980), p.
Now that Congress has declared polygraphic lie detection unlawful in many situations, test developers are promoting new self-report paper-and-pencil "honesty" or "integrity" tests.
To begin with the obvious: We are concerned here with constitutional commitments, and because the Constitution is polygraphic, it follows that from the point of view of any individual, it is the commitment as such, not the merit of the principles or institutions framed by the Constitution, that does the binding.
Seventy-two hour polygraphic and behavioral recordings of wakefulness and sleep in a hospital geriatric unit: comparison between demented and non-demented patients.