polygraph

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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

/poly·graph/ (pol´e-graf) an apparatus for simultaneously recording blood pressure, pulse, and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as a lie detector.

polygraph

(pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. poly·graphed, poly·graphing, poly·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.

polygraph

[pol′ē·graf]
Etymology: Gk, polys + graphein, to write
an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as lie detector.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

polygraph

Lie detector A device designed to detect deception by evaluating physiologic responses to various spoken questions, measuring and recording changes in electrical and mechanical impulses in various parameters–eg, bp, respiratory rate, galvanic skin reflex

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

An instrument that simultaneously records changes in various physiological parameter such as pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and skin resistance changes from sweating. These sensitively reflect alterations in the emotions and the device is used to detect deception in answers to questions. A ‘lie detector’.

polygraph

an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Government polygraphers readily acknowledge that their exams are not faultless, since humans must ultimately interpret the physiological data.
Polygraphers will now have to give written explanation of Sections 3.
One example of the difference in research methods between psychologists and polygraphers can be seen in the area of behavior symptoms in lying individuals.
In the real world, the decision to stop polygraphing depends on whether investigators are satisfied that all of the perpetrators have been identified, not on whether the polygrapher caught one.
Because polygraphers seldom discover ground truth except as a consequence of post-test confessions, and because diagnoses evaluated in this way are almost invariably verified as correct, the typical experienced examiner will accumulate a personal record of almost unblemished accuracy (p.
First is the assertion that polygraphers believe in their exams so strongly that they usually stop testing other suspects once one has failed.
In fact, even so-called experts who make such judgments for a living--police interrogators; judges; psychiatrists; and polygraphers for the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigations, and the military--are highly prone to error.
In a now-famous study from more than a decade ago, about 500 Secret Service agents, federal polygraphers, and judges watched 10 1-minute video clips of female nurses describing the pleasant nature films they were supposedly watching as they spoke.
Vicky McCann, chairwoman of the British Natural Body Building Federation, said: "We have heard about these tricks, but so have the polygraphers.
129) This paradigm is different than the Control Question Test typically used by professional polygraphers.
Employees of the State Bureau of Investigation who are employed as polygraphers will now be subject to the licensing requirements of the Polygraph Examiners Act.
In field studies, "confessions are most often obtained by polygraphers after a subject has failed the polygraph test.