polygraph


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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

/poly·graph/ (pol´e-graf) an apparatus for simultaneously recording blood pressure, pulse, and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as a lie detector.

polygraph

(pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. poly·graphed, poly·graphing, poly·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.

polygraph

[pol′ē·graf]
Etymology: Gk, polys + graphein, to write
an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as lie detector.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

polygraph

Lie detector A device designed to detect deception by evaluating physiologic responses to various spoken questions, measuring and recording changes in electrical and mechanical impulses in various parameters–eg, bp, respiratory rate, galvanic skin reflex

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

An instrument that simultaneously records changes in various physiological parameter such as pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and skin resistance changes from sweating. These sensitively reflect alterations in the emotions and the device is used to detect deception in answers to questions. A ‘lie detector’.

polygraph

an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
29) Therefore, when a judge considers a motion to suppress a statement because of a coercive post-polygraph interrogation, MRE 104(a) permits the judge to consider the circumstances of the polygraph test.
2008), the court granted a motion in limine, excluding polygraph testimony of an individual accused of insider trading.
In 1984, psychologist David Lykken, who published many articles in peer-reviewed journals about the polygraph, addressed a conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science about the so-called lie detector.
Many of the polygraph examiners are former officers injured on the job.
In 1951, the New York Times reported that polygraph testing had become commonplace within the CIA, and by 1953 the Army routinely tested its ranks on the device for hints of treasonous sentiment.
Understandably, polygraph enterprises cautiously resist change so contrastingly instead of constructing a new polygraph unit, we offer a technique virtually up for grabs for "existing standard issue polygraphs".
The point is that countless stories have appeared in newsletters and journals advocating the use of the polygraph, but little information has been published on its utilitarian value, or usefulness.
We plan to investigate the potential of fMRI both as a standalone test and as a supplement to polygraph, with the goal of creating the most accurate test for deception," he said.
In 1983, the Office of Technology Assessment concluded that, "the available research evidence does not establish the scientific validity of the polygraph test for personnel security screening.
Supreme Court held that either side could ban the results of a polygraph examination from use in a criminal trial because there is no consensus that polygraph evidence is reliable.
He stated that plants could perceive, as recorded by polygraph, the killing of brine shrimp
Professor Grubin said: "I'm a great supporter of the polygraph.