polygenesis


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polygenesis

(pŏl′ē-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
Development from more than one source.

pol′y·ge·net′ic (pŏl′ē-jə-nĕt′ĭk), po·lyg′e·nous (pə-lĭj′ə-nəs) adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This work aimed to characterise the morphology and mineralogy of different gravels from an Oxisol in the Brazilian Cerrado region, and to provide insight on how these materials can further understanding of soil polygenesis.
In general, those who discussed these pronominal forms in the individual languages, especially Romanian and Italo-Romance, tended to favor their polygenesis, while those with a broader Romance perspective tended to view them as related.
Even those Catholic bishops in the South who defended slavery simultaneously "scoffed at claims of polygenesis, that African Americans represented not just another race but another species" (McGreevy 55).
No Cold or Empty Heart': Polygenesis, Scientific Professionalism, and the
4 Polygenesis, the formation of one or more supernumerary teeth occurs much less frequently than agenesis.
The transmission of original sin from Adam to the whole human race as well as Christ's atonement would not be possible if polygenesis became accepted.
The egalitarian dynamic latent in the ideal of a humanity united by reason was undermined by the placing of humans squarely in the natural world, to be subdivided and ranked according to the same principles of speciation as the animal kingdom; in nineteenth-century France especially, ideas of polygenesis were widely accepted, enlarging the potential for ideologies of racial subordination.
The problem became even more complicated when a fierce controversy developed over the question of monogenesis or polygenesis.
One such area of science was polygenesis, which gave credence to Black Africans as inherently inferior.
While her descriptions of polygenesis, monogenesis, and polycentrism are well-described, her account of human evolution smacks of early twentieth-century evolutionary theory rather than contemporary theory.
Slavery's apologists often rested their argument on the theory of polygenesis, which held that the races were created separately--a view that was also held by many anti-slavery activists who still saw blacks as inferior, despite their arguments against the slave system.
His study on "Slavery's Champions Stood at Odds: Polygenesis and the Defense of Slavery" was selected by a committee at the Richards Civil War Era Center at the Pennsylvania State University.