polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons


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polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Compounds found in the particulate content of diesel exhaust, tobacco smoke, smoked food, whisky, coal tar anti-dandruff shampoos and other elements in the human environment that have been suspected, but not proved, of being capable of causing cancer.
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Those polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which have low molecular weight with two to three fused rings are more volatile, water soluble, and are mostly found in vapour phase, whereas, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight have many fused rings and are found adhered with the particles ( Smith et al.
Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain on a request from the European Commission on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Food.
Although visible oil was not found away from the coast once the well was capped, levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were elevated during and after the spill, declining to background by a year later.
FDA also calculated allowable thresholds, known as levels of concern, for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in each type of Gulf seafood it tested.
They found that steaks fried on a gas hob produce more potentially harmful polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
The research on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in smokeless tobacco adds to existing evidence that smokeless contains two-dozen other carcinogens that cause oral and pancreatic cancers.
The water, known to contain dozens of toxic contaminants such as heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and naphthenic acids, enters the groundwater and the Athabasca River before the river flows into Fort Chipewyan and the Peace Athabasca Delta, one of the world's largest inland freshwater deltas.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can be formed from both natural and anthropogenic sources.
The program differs from the previous round of testing conducted in 2002 in that it is specifically aimed at finding and testing dust for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, lead, asbestos, and manmade vitreous fibers, four substances that the EPA's top scientists have said are prevalent toxins contained in the WTC dust and act as an "fingerprint" differentiating WTC from urban dust which can also contain contaminants.
In April, the Center for Children's Environmental Health at Columbia University released findings concluding that children exposed to combustion-related pollutants known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the womb are 2.

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