polyandrous


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polyandrous

  1. (of female animals) mating with more than one male at a time.
  2. (of plants) having numerous, i.e. more than 20, stamens.
References in periodicals archive ?
While both monogamous and polyandrous marriages exist side by side (together with, to a lesser extent, polygynous marriages) in agricultural areas of Tibet, it is clear from numerous studies that polyandrous marriage units are sought whenever possible.
Furthermore, the semen of many polyandrous species becomes more viscous after ejaculation than that of other primates, forming a solid plug in extreme cases.
In Loasaceae, the polyandrous genera do not form a monophyletic group (Moody & Hufford, 2000; Moody et al.
This is no irrevocable original sin, but `Crishna' himself advises that the holy fruit may be restored to its branch only if each of the Pandavas and their polyandrous wife Draupadi confesses his/her innermost sins.
The local hospitals have much larger stocks of penicillin than average to treat these diseases,' says Professor Vijay Sisodia, who has spent years studying polyandrous families.
This was a polyandrous society where wives could have more than one husband, all of whom were brothers; the number of husbands was shown by the number of horns on the women's hats.
33 appears to be far below the credible level for any significant number of societies, even the handful of polyandrous ones.
Similarly, the introductory essay on breeding behavior focuses entirely on the Eurasian brood-parasitic cuckoos, scarcely even mentioning the polyandrous coucals, the facultatively parasitic Coccyzus cuckoos, or the bizarre communal breeding systems of the crotophagine cuckoos (Crotophaga and Guira).
Podisus nigrispinus is polyandrous and its females perform up to 13 copulations with 3 to 4 males over a 1-2 wk period, which is sufficient to fertilize its eggs and to produce nymphs for over 80% of its lifetime (Torres & Zanuncio 2001).
Topics from the post-socialist and reform eras include religion and conflict in Russia's Altai Republic; modern religious discourses of anti-Muslim economic activism in the Tibetan province of Amdo; narratives of destruction in the Bodongpa Monasteries of central Tibet; violence, leadership, and religious authority in Amdo; and conflict and mediation within polyandrous houses in central Tibet.
The researchers are of the opinion that their findings have relevance for a range of species with polyandrous females, including some primates.
Males of this species suffer high extrinsic mortality and normally do not encounter more than one female in natural conditions, while females are often polyandrous (Segoli et al.