polyandrous


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polyandrous

  1. (of female animals) mating with more than one male at a time.
  2. (of plants) having numerous, i.e. more than 20, stamens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the Nyinba, marriage is usually patrilocal and normally either monogamous or polyandrous, followed by a few cases of polygyny.
For example, the paternally active Igf2 gene from males of the polyandrous species would then be paired with an unsilenced copy of the Igf2 gene from a female of the monogamous species.
Parental care and mating behaviour of polyandrous dunhocks Prunella modularis related to paternity by DNA fingerprinting.
A camera system embedded in a nest-box (consisting of a computer, two cameras with infrared lighting, a chip reader device, an infrared light barrier, and a 60 Ah 12 V traction battery) was used to determine the prey delivered to the polyandrous nests in 2014.
It is entirely Lama, composed of ethnic Tibetan Buddhists, who speak Tibetan as their first language, follow the traditions of the Nyingmapa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, and practice polyandry (about 35% of marriages are polyandrous in 1996, and 42% of the monogamous marriages used to be polyandrous before brothers split up and remarried monogamously, see Haddix McKay, this volume).
This indicates that under a polyandrous system, females may avoid costly growth under poor conditions and instead forage for male nuptial gifts as adults and in practice "trade nuptial gifts for offspring.
Our study differs from comparable studies of polyandrous and polygynandrous species in the lack of an obvious behavioral cue males might use to judge their paternity.
However, females in the Asian glow-worm firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis were also found to be highly polyandrous, mating with up to 7 different males (Fu et al.
Sexual selection, arrival times, philopatry, and site fidelity in the polyandrous Spotted Sandpiper.
However, since nutrients are also transferred during mating, several authors have predicted that polyandrous females in particular may use these nutrients to finance egg production or enhance survivorship (Boggs and Gilbert 1979; Boggs and Watt 1981).
Podisus nigrispinus is polyandrous and its females perform up to 13 copulations with 3 to 4 males over a 1-2 wk period, which is sufficient to fertilize its eggs and to produce nymphs for over 80% of its lifetime (Torres & Zanuncio 2001).
Social organization of cooperatively polyandrous White-winged Trumpeters (Psophia leucoptera).