policeman


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po·lice·man

(pō-lēs'măn),
An instrument, usually a rubber-tipped rod, for removing solid particles from a container, particularly the walls of that container.

policeman

/po·lice·man/ (pah-lēs´min) a glass rod with a piece of rubber tubing on one end, used as a stirring rod and transfer tool in chemical analysis.

po·lice·man

(pó-lēs'măn)
An instrument, usually a rubber-tipped rod, for removing solid particles from a glass container.
References in classic literature ?
Fortunately, the policeman is disposed to be reasonable, and so it is not Marija who is flung out of the place.
The policeman went on writing in his notebook; twice he put his pencil in his mouth, and once he dipped it in the treacle.
The policeman was a representative of the law, and law is sacred to an Englishman.
When it arrived there, four guards and a police officer, who accompanied it, mounted into the heavy machine and closed the shutters; then through an opening cautiously made, the policeman began to watch the length of the Rue Cocatrix, as if he was waiting for some one.
Some of them were more fair to see than the others; many were (to put it mildly) somewhat over-masted; all were expected to make good passages; and of all that line of ships, whose rigging made a thick, enormous network against the sky, whose brasses flashed almost as far as the eye of the policeman at the gates could reach, there was hardly one that knew of any other port amongst all the ports on the wide earth but London and Sydney, or London and Melbourne, or London and Adelaide, perhaps with Hobart Town added for those of smaller tonnage.
Leave all behind in its place, or I'll send for a policeman to search you.
A policeman was beside us, his notebook in his hand.
It was said that he had carefully cut away the props so that they would not support anything so heavy as a policeman.
A policeman had strolled up and was eyeing him curiously.
A policeman has already walked up to the room, and walked down again to the door, where he stands like a tower, only condescending to see the boys at his base occasionally; but whenever he does see them, they quail and fall back.
Adroitly D'Arnot led the conversation from point to point until the policeman had explained to the interested Tarzan many of the methods in vogue for apprehending and identifying criminals.
Then, with his watch still in his hand, he went up to the policeman, and asked him if he knew what the time was.