pole

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pole

 [pōl]
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other). adj., adj po´lar.
cephalic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole the most prominent part of the anterior end of each cerebral hemisphere.
occipital pole the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
pelvic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the brain.

pole

(pōl), [TA]
1. One of two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from its equator.
3. One of two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA]
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

(pōl)
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points which have opposite physical qualities.po´lar

animal pole 
1. the site of an oocyte to which the nucleus is approximated, and from which the polar bodies pinch off.
2. in nonmammalian species, the pole of an egg less heavily laden with yolk than the vegetal pole and exhibiting faster cell division.
cephalic pole  the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole of cerebral hemisphere  the most prominent part of the anterior end of each hemisphere.
germinal pole  animal p.
occipital pole of cerebral hemisphere  the posterior end of the occipital lobe.
pelvic pole  the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole of cerebral hemisphere  the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe.
vegetal pole  that pole of an oocyte at which the greater amount of food yolk is deposited.

pole

(pōl)
n.
Biology
1. Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.
2. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
3. The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.

pole

Etymology: L, polus
1 (in biology) an end of an imaginary axis drawn through the symmetrically arranged parts of a cell, organ, ovum, or nucleus.
2 one of a pair of opposite forces or attractants, as in magnetism or electricity.
3 (in anatomy) the point on a nerve cell at which a dendrite originates. polar, adj.

pole

(pōl) [TA]
1. One of the two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of the two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from the equator.
3. One of the two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA] .
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

1. either extremity of any axis, as of a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other).

control pole
a pole with a loop at one end for capturing wild or dangerous small animals. The loop is put over the animal's head and pulled tight. Good poles have a nonslip device so that the animal cannot slip free because of relaxation on the cord by the operator.
frontal pole
the most prominent part of the anterior end of each hemisphere of the brain.
occipital pole
the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
temporal pole
the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the human brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
This simplified model clearly showed that the enhanced planetary tilt was the cause of the poleward amplification of climate change due to the poleward increase of net solar radiative flux absorbed by the planet.
As mentioned, the distributional range of many wildlife species and vectors is predicted to shift poleward and toward higher altitudes as the climate warms, perhaps bringing hosts, vectors, and diseases currently restricted to the tropics within the range of temperate population centers.
Complex terrain and habitat fragmentation and non-availability may hinder natural poleward migration.
edulis, water temperatures are exceeding the thermal maxima of this species and therefore have the potential to shift this southern boundary in a poleward direction.
Tiny shrimp-like animals called copepods are shifting geographic distribution poleward at rates up to 30 times faster than many land species.
Arid subtropical climate zones are expanding poleward.
Large storms move the aurora (brilliant display of bands or streamers of light observed in the night sky, particularly in polar regions) equatorward over the United States, and all magnetic storms have the potential to move equatorial plasma poleward and create thicker ionospheres.
Precipitation has increased poleward from 30[degrees]N latitude from 1900-2005, while a decrease in precipitation has dominated in the tropics.
Precipitation reductions also appear likely in those areas because the mid-latitude storm tracks will tend to move poleward while the high-pressure systems centered over the dry subtropics will expand in size.
Methane (and carbon dioxide) add to the warming of the Arctic because heat is naturally transported poleward.
1994): Some features of the Portugal Current System: a poleward slope undercurrent, an upwelling-related summer southward flow and an autumn-winter poleward coastal surface current.