pole

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Related to poles: magnetic poles, North and South Poles

pole

 [pōl]
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other). adj., adj po´lar.
cephalic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole the most prominent part of the anterior end of each cerebral hemisphere.
occipital pole the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
pelvic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the brain.

pole

(pōl), [TA]
1. One of two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from its equator.
3. One of two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA]
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

(pōl)
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points which have opposite physical qualities.po´lar

animal pole 
1. the site of an oocyte to which the nucleus is approximated, and from which the polar bodies pinch off.
2. in nonmammalian species, the pole of an egg less heavily laden with yolk than the vegetal pole and exhibiting faster cell division.
cephalic pole  the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole of cerebral hemisphere  the most prominent part of the anterior end of each hemisphere.
germinal pole  animal p.
occipital pole of cerebral hemisphere  the posterior end of the occipital lobe.
pelvic pole  the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole of cerebral hemisphere  the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe.
vegetal pole  that pole of an oocyte at which the greater amount of food yolk is deposited.

pole

(pōl)
n.
Biology
1. Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.
2. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
3. The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.

pole

Etymology: L, polus
1 (in biology) an end of an imaginary axis drawn through the symmetrically arranged parts of a cell, organ, ovum, or nucleus.
2 one of a pair of opposite forces or attractants, as in magnetism or electricity.
3 (in anatomy) the point on a nerve cell at which a dendrite originates. polar, adj.

pole

(pōl) [TA]
1. One of the two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of the two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from the equator.
3. One of the two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA] .
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

1. either extremity of any axis, as of a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other).

control pole
a pole with a loop at one end for capturing wild or dangerous small animals. The loop is put over the animal's head and pulled tight. Good poles have a nonslip device so that the animal cannot slip free because of relaxation on the cord by the operator.
frontal pole
the most prominent part of the anterior end of each hemisphere of the brain.
occipital pole
the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
temporal pole
the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the human brain.
References in classic literature ?
Sancho fell upon his knees devoutly appealing to heaven to deliver him from such imminent peril; which it did by the activity and quickness of the millers, who, pushing against the boat with their poles, stopped it, not, however, without upsetting and throwing Don Quixote and Sancho into the water; and lucky it was for Don Quixote that he could swim like a goose, though the weight of his armour carried him twice to the bottom; and had it not been for the millers, who plunged in and hoisted them both out, it would have been Troy town with the pair of them.
It is possible, if the sea exists at the South Pole, that it may be covered; and, consequently, we shall be unable to come to the surface.
Katerina Ivanovna was irritated too by the fact that hardly any of the lodgers invited had come to the funeral, except the Pole who had just managed to run into the cemetery, while to the memorial dinner the poorest and most insignificant of them had turned up, the wretched creatures, many of them not quite sober.
JEREMY stuck his pole into the mud and fastened his boat to it.
On the feet were some old boots with blue tops, such as every man wore in this country, and the figure was raised above the stalks of corn by means of the pole stuck up its back.
I don't know, Miss Honeychurch, if you have noticed that Miss Pole, the lady who has so much yellow hair, takes lemonade.
The distance from the barrier to the pole was no more than a swift flier should cover in a few hours, and so it was assumed that some frightful catastrophe awaited those who reached the "forbidden land," as it had come to be called by the Martians of the outer world.
The pole was firmly fixed in the mud, and he was left clinging to it while the punt drifted away.
The barber's pole I successfully extracted from David's mouth, but the difficulty (not foreseen) of knowing how to dispose of a barber's pole in the Kensington Gardens is considerable, there always being polite children hovering near who run after you and restore it to you.
They had no oars, nor even a pole to guide the raft with.
The next they saw was a lithe form spring to the sill of the open window and leap, panther-like, onto the pole across the walk.
On the contrary, he is ungratefully disposed to regret the North Pole.