poison sumac


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poison sumac

/poi·son su·mac/ (soo´mak) Rhus vernix.

poison sumac

n.
1. A shrub or small tree (Toxicodendron vernix) of eastern North American wetlands, having compound leaves and greenish-white berries and causing a rash on contact.
2. A skin rash caused by contact with this plant.

poison sumac

[so̅o̅′mak]
a shrub of the genus Rhus, common in North America. Skin contact results in allergic dermatitis in many people. The characteristics and treatment of the condition are similar to those of poison ivy. See also poison ivy, rhus dermatitis, urushiol.

poi·son i·vy

, poison oak , poison sumac (poy'zŏn ī'vē, ōk, sūmak)
2. Common name for the cutaneous eruption caused by contact with these species of Toxicodendron.

poison

a substance that, on ingestion, inhalation, absorption, application, injection or development within the body, in relatively small amounts, may cause structural damage or functional disturbance.
Corrosives are poisons that destroy tissues directly. They include the mineral acids, such as nitric acid, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid, and the caustic alkalis, such as ammonia, sodium hydroxide (lye), sodium carbonate and sodium hypochlorite; and carbolic acid (phenol).
Irritants are poisons that inflame the mucous membranes by direct action. These include copper sulfate, salts of lead, cantharidin, oxalate raphides, and many plant and insect poisons.
Nerve toxins act on the nerves or affect some of the basic cell processes. This large group includes the narcotics, such as opium, heroin and cocaine, and the barbiturates, anesthetics and alcohols.
Blood toxins act on the blood and deprive it of oxygen. They include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrocyanic acid and the gases used in chemical warfare. Some blood toxins destroy the blood cells or the platelets.
See also poisoning and names of individual poisons.

poison bean
sesbania spp., thermopsismontana.
berry poison
gastrolobiumparvifolium.
box poison
gastrolobiumparviflorum.
bullock poison
gastrolobiumtrilobum.
poison bush
thesiumnamaquense.
bushman's poison
poison buttercup
ranunculusscleratus.
camel poison
erythrophleumchlorostachys.
candyup poison
stypandra glauca.
Champion Bay poison
gastrolobiumoxyloboides.
clover-leaf poison
goodialotifolia.
cluster poison
gastrolobiumbennettsianum.
poison Control Center
public facility set up to provide information around the clock to provide information on toxicity of substances and current information of correct first aid methods and antidotes for poisoning emergencies.
crinkle-leaf poison
gastrolobiumvillosum.
desert poison bush
gastrolobiumgrandiflorum.
poison elder
Gilbernene poison
gastrolobiumrotundifolium.
granite poison
gastrolobiumgraniticum.
heart-leaf poison bush
gastrolobiumbilobum or G. grandiflorum.
poison hemlock
Hill River poison
gastrolobiumpolystachyum.
hook-point poison
gastrolobiumhamulosum.
horned poison
gastrolobiumpolystachyum.
Hutt River poison
gastrolobiumpropinquum.
insect poison
poison ivy
toxicodendronradicans.
kite-leaf poison
gastrolobiumlaytonii.
lamb poison
isotropiscuneifolia.
poison leaf
dichapetalumcymosum.
poison lobelia
lobeliapratioides.
mallet poison
gastrolobiumdensifolium.
marlock poison
gastrolobiumparviflorum.
poison morning glory
ipomoeamuelleri.
narrow-leaf poison
gastrolobiumstenophyllum.
net-leaf poison
gastrolobiumracemosum.
poison oak
toxicodendrondiversilobum, T. quercifolium.
poison onion
dipcadiglaucum.
pea-blossom poison
poison peach
trematomentosa. Called also peach-leaf poison bush.
poison pimelea
pimeleapauciflora.
poison pod albizia
albiziaversicolor.
prickly poison
gastrolobiumspinosum.
rigid-leaf poison
gastrolobiumrigidum.
river poison
gastrolobiumforrestii.
river poison tree
excoecariadallachyana.
rock poison
gastrolobiumcallistachys.
Roe's poison
gastrolobiumspectabile.
round-leaf poison
gastrolobiumpycnostachyum.
runner poison
gastrolobiumovalifolium.
poison sage
isotropisatropurpurea.
sandplain poison
gastrolobiummicrocarpum.
scale-leaf poison
gastrolobiumappressum.
poison sedge
schoenusasperocarpus.
slender poison
gastrolobiumheterophyllum.
slender lamb poison
isotropisjuncea.
spike poison
gastrolobiumglaucum.
Stirling Range poison
gastrolobiumvelutinum.
poison suckleya
poison sumac
thick-leaf poison
gastrolobiumcrassifolium.
poison vetch
wallflower poison
gastrolobiumgrandiflorum.
wodjil poison
gastrolobiumfloribundum.
woolly poison
gastrolobiumtomentosum.
York Road poison
gastrolobiumcalycinum.

sumac

Rhus spp. trees and shrubs.

poison sumac

Patient discussion about poison sumac

Q. is poison ivy or sumac contagious

A. if you scratch the rash and it has open sores,the pus from the sores can spread to other parts of the body and to other people as well,

More discussions about poison sumac
References in periodicals archive ?
When I mention making a beverage from sumac, many people who have heard of poison sumac think I am crazy.
Pulling onto the shoulder, ironically just this side of an "Emergency Stopping Only" sign, I escorted my little grandson to an emergency bathroom behind a shrub of poison sumac.
It belongs instead to the cashew family, as do its relatives, poison ivy and poison sumac.
Get acquainted with poison oak and poison sumac, too, however less common they may be in your particular neck of the woods.
But this little ditty ignores poison sumac, which has seven leaves and is just as bothersome.
org , poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac all contain the same oily substance that causes rashes, urushiol.
Poison sumac has whitish berries that hang down, and it is kind of rare.
Poison ivy usually grows east of the Rockies, and poison sumac east of the Mississippi River.
This useful plant is not to be confused with three sumacs that grow wild in North America, all of which can cause severe dermatitis: poison oak, poison ivy, and poison sumac.
While my other companion waited, I followed the racket down swales and over dales, through Canadian thistles, poison sumac, and thickets of briars to where I came upon Brutus happily excavating a hole that had been dug by the grandson of the woodchuck that had walked off the Ark.