pneumonic plague


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Related to pneumonic plague: bubonic plague

pneu·mon·ic plague

a rapidly progressive and frequently fatal form of plague in which there are areas of pulmonary consolidation, with chills, pain in the side, bloody expectoration, high fever, and possible human-to-human transmission.

pneumonic plague

[no̅o̅mon′ik]
Etymology: Gk, pneumon, lung; L, plaga, stroke
a highly virulent and rapidly fatal form of plague characterized by bronchopneumonia. There are two forms: primary pneumonic plague, which results from involvement of the lungs in the course of bubonic plague, and secondary pneumonic plague, which results from the inhalation of infected particles of sputum from a person having pneumonic plague. Aerolized Yersinia pestis could be used to cause pneumonic plague in a bioterrorism attack. Compare bubonic plague, septicemic plague. See also plague, Yersinia pestis.

pneu·mon·ic plague

(nū-mon'ik plāg)
A rapidly progressive and frequently fatal form of plague in which there are areas of pulmonary consolidation, with chills, pain in the side, bloody expectoration, and high fever.
See also: Yersinia pestis

pneumonic plague

A severe and often fatal complication of bubonic PLAGUE in which the infection spreads to the lungs. Unlike bubonic plague, pneumonic plague can spread directly from case to case.

pneumonic plague

see BLACK DEATH.

plague

an epidemic of disease attended by great mortality.

bubonic plague
an acute febrile, infectious, highly fatal disease caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis. It is primarily a disease of rats and other rodents, dogs and cats, and is usually spread to humans by fleas. The more common form of plague is the bubonic. There is also a pneumonic type in humans, which can be spread directly from person to person by droplet infection. The clinical signs in all species are fever, vomiting and enlargement of lymph nodes, the buboes that give the disease its name.
cattle plague
duck plague
an acute infectious disease of ducks caused by a herpesvirus and characterized by tissue hemorrhages and blood free in body cavities, eruptions on the mucosae of the digestive tract, degeneration of parenchymatous organs and lesions in lymph nodes. Called also duck virus enteritis.
equine plague
see african horse sickness.
fowl plague
see avian influenza.
pneumonic plague
see bubonic plague (above).
septicemic plague
hematogenous spread of infection to many organs may occur without the formation of buboes; occurs in the cat with pulmonary involvement, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and death.
swine plague
see swine plague.
sylvatic plague
bubonic plague in wild animals in uninhabited areas. See also sylvatic plague.
References in periodicals archive ?
On January 26, a second wave of human pneumonic plague cases was observed in 12 other persons (Figure 2; Table 1).
Chloramphenicol and terramycin in the treatment of pneumonic plague.
Our survey indicates that should an outbreak of pneumonic plague occur, the inclination of the British public would be to adopt a range of spontaneous precautionary behaviors.
Primary pneumonic plague is acquired by inhaling infective droplets from persons or animals and rarely by accidental aerosol exposure.
However, the possibility of an intentional aerosol release of plague bacteria causing numerous contagious primary pneumonic plague cases has been a top concern of bioterrorism specialists (1).
Imported vectors then have the potential to initiate outbreaks of pneumonic plague.
Exposure to aerosolized Yersinia pestis results in pneumonic plague, which has a typical incubation period of 2 to 4 days (range 1-6 days).
Another example of large-scale quarantine occurred in Los Angeles in 1924 during the last epidemic of pneumonic plague in this country (12).
According to scientists working at Public Health England in Porton Down, the plague was a pneumonic plague instead of the bubonic plague with infection spreading from human to human, rather than by rat fleas.
If left untreated, bubonic plague can kill from septic shock within about three to six days of the onset of symptoms, or sometimes turn into the rarer pneumonic plague, which can be spread from person to person through infected droplets, in a similar way to the spread of colds and other respiratory illnesses.
According to experts, the bubonic plague form, transmitted from person to person by direct contact and usually localized in bubo, is not as dangerous as pneumonic plague, which is spread by airborne transmission.