pneumatocele


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pneumatocele

 [noo-mat´o-sēl]
1. a tumor or cyst formed by air or other gas filling an adventitious pouch, such as a laryngocele, tracheocele, or gaseous swelling of the scrotum. Called also aerocele and pneumocele.
2. a usually benign, thin-walled, air-containing cyst of the lung, as in staphylococcal pneumonia. Called also pneumocele and pneumonocele.

pneu·mat·o·cele

(nū-mat'ō-sēl),
1. An emphysematous or gaseous swelling.
2. Synonym(s): pneumonocele
3. A thin-walled cavity within the lung, one of the characteristic sequelae of staphylococcal pneumonia and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.
[G. pneuma, air, + kēlē, tumor, hernia]

pneumatocele

/pneu·ma·to·cele/ (noo-mat´o-sēl)
1. aerocele; a tumor or cyst formed by air or other gas filling an adventitious pouch, such as a laryngocele, tracheocele, or gaseous swelling of the scrotum.
2. a usually benign, thin-walled, air-containing cyst of the lung, as in staphylococcal pneumonia.

pneumatocele

[noo͡mat′əsēl′]
1 a thin-walled cavity in the lung parenchyma caused by partial airway obstruction.
2 a hernial protrusion of lung tissue.
3 a tumor or sac containing gas, especially of the scrotum. Also called pneumonocele [no̅o̅mon′əsēl] .

pneu·mat·o·cele

(nū-mat'ō-sēl)
1. An emphysematous or gaseous swelling.
2. Synonym(s): pneumonocele.
3. A thin-walled cavity within the lung, one of the characteristic sequelae of staphylococcus pneumonia.
[G. pneuma, air, + kēlē, tumor, hernia]

pneumatocele

1. hernia of lung tissue.
2. a usually benign, thin-walled, air-containing cyst of the lung.
3. a tumor or sac containing gas, especially a gaseous swelling of the scrotum.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case study, a 17 year-old male motor vehicle accident victim suffered severe trauma including bilateral lung contusions with pneumatoceles, several fractures to his femur, forearm, ribs, and thoracic vertebrae, plus splenic and liver lacerations.
patients): bronchopleural fistula (3), pyopneumothorax (2), pneumatoceles (4), lung abscess (1), mechanical ventilation >48 h (2), severe anemia requiring blood transfusion (2), severe hypoalbuminemia requiring seroalbumin replacement (1).
Despite the presence of acute pneumatocoeles, CT chest scans at six months are generally normal although pneumatoceles may take up to a year to resolve(24).
It has been described in a patient with necrotizing pneumonia with numerous pneumatoceles.