pleural exudate

pleural exudate

Pulmonary medicine An abnormal accumulation of protein-rich fluid in the pleural space Etiology Infection–bacterial, TB, viral, chylothorax, neoplasm, PTE with pulmonary infarction, GI disease, collagen vascular disease–eg, SLE, asbestosis, pancreatitis, traumatic tap, postcardiotomy, neoplasm Management Thoracentesis. See Pleural effusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pleural exudate solidified to form a gelatinous covering on the lung (Figure, panel B).
If the cause of a pleural exudate remains unclear despite repeated thoracentesis with appropriate evaluation followed by an ultrasound-guided core needle/Abrams needle biopsy as described above, the next step would be to offer the patient a medical or surgical thoracoscopy.
The tests performed showed an inhibition effect on leukocyte migration, and a reduction on pleural exudate, as well as dose-dependant peripheral analgesic activity, at a range of 25-100 mg/kg i.
Cholesterol: a useful parameter for distinguishing between pleural exudates and transudates.
Typical post-mortem lesions like conspicuous pleuritis with abundant pleural exudates (Thiacourt and Bolske, 2011), excessive quantities of straw coloured fluid with fibrinous flakes (Kaliner and Mac Owan, 1975; Wesonga et al.
Evaluation of different criteria for the separation of pleural exudates from transudates.
In the light of these observations, Adenosine deaminase assay has been found to be simple and useful investigation in the diagnosis of pleural effusion by many studies particularly in differentiating tuberculous and malignant effusions the two most common causes from each other and from other causes of pleural exudates.