pleura


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Related to pleura: peritoneum, Cervical pleura

pleura

 [ploor´ah] (Gr.)
the serous membrane investing the lungs (visceral or pulmonary pleura) and lining the walls of the thoracic cavity (parietal pleura); the two layers enclose a potential space, the pleural cavity. adj., adj pleu´ral.

pleur·a

, gen. and pl.

pleu·rae

(plūr'ă, plūr'ē), [TA]
The serous membrane enveloping the lungs and lining the walls of the pulmonary cavities.
Synonym(s): membrana succingens
[G. pleura, a rib, pl. the side]

pleura

/pleu·ra/ (ploor´ah) pl. pleu´rae   [Gr.] the serous membrane investing the lungs (visceral p.) and lining the walls of the thoracic cavity (parietal p.); the two layers enclose a potential space, the pleural cavity. The two pleurae, right and left, are entirely distinct from each other.pleu´ral
Enlarge picture
Pleura; for purpose of illustration, the pleural cavity is shown as an actual space.

pleura 1

(plo͝or′ə)
n. pl. pleurae (plo͝or′ē)
A thin serous membrane in mammals that envelops each lung and folds back to make a lining for the chest cavity.

pleu′ral adj.

pleura 2

(plo͝or′ə)
n.
Plural of pleuron.

pleura

[ploo͡r′ə] pl. pleurae
Etymology: Gk, rib
a delicate serous membrane enclosing the lung, composed of a single layer of flattened mesothelial cells resting on a delicate membrane of connective tissue. Beneath the membrane is a stroma of collagenous tissue containing yellow elastic fibers. The pleura divides into the visceral pleura, which covers the lung, dipping into the fissures between the lobes, and the parietal pleura, which lines the chest wall, covers the diaphragm, and reflects over the structures in the mediastinum. The parietal and visceral pleurae are separated from each other by a small amount of fluid that acts as a lubricant as the lungs expand and contract during respiration. See also pleural cavity, pleural space. pleural, adj.

pleur·a

, pl. pleurae (plūr'ă, -ē) [TA]
The serous membrane enveloping the lungs and lining the walls of the pleural cavity.
[G. pleura, a rib, pl. the side]

pleura

(ploo'ra) plural.pleurae [Gr., side]
Enlarge picture
PLEURAE
A serous membrane that enfolds both lungs and is reflected upon the walls of the thorax and diaphragm. The pleurae are moistened with a serous secretion that reduces friction during respiratory movements of the lungs. See: pleural effusion; mediastinum; thorax; illustration

costal pleura

Parietal pleura.

pleura diaphragmatica

The part of the pleura covering the upper surface of the diaphragm.

mediastinal pleura

The portion of the parietal pleura that extends to cover the mediastinum.

parietal pleura

The serous membrane that lines the chest cavity; it extends from the mediastinal roots of the lungs and covers the sides of the pericardium to the chest wall and backward to the spine. The visceral and parietal pleural layers are separated only by a lubricating secretion. These layers may become adherent or separated by air or by blood, pus, or other fluids, when the lungs or chest wall are injured or inflamed.
Synonym: costal pleura

pleura pericardiaca

The portion of the pleura covering the pericardium.

pleura pulmonalis

Visceral pleura.

visceral pleura

The pleura that covers the lungs and enters into and lines the interlobar fissures. It is loose at the base and at the sternal and vertebral borders to allow for lung expansion.

pleura

The thin, double-layered membrane that separated the lungs from the inside of the chest wall. The inner layer is attached to the lung and the outer to the inside of the chest cavity. A film of fluid between the two layers provides lubrication to allow smooth movement during breathing.

pleura

the membrane that covers the lung and lines the innermost wall of the thorax.

Pleura or pleurae

A delicate membrane that encloses the lungs. The pleura is divided into two areas separated by fluid-the visceral pleura, which covers the lungs, and the parietal pleura, which lines the chest wall and covers the diaphragm.
Figure 1: Ascending nerve pathways and proprioceptive reflex arcs, represented in diagrammatic sections of the brain and spinal cord. Shown on the right: those serving the sensations listed. Shown on the left: reflex pathways for skeletal muscle control. (A) From a muscle spindle, to a synapse with an alpha motor neuron, and a branch to the brain. (B) From a tendon organ, inhibitory branch (broken line) to an alpha motor neuron, and a branch to the brain.

pleura

thin membrane in two layers in continuity, which cover the lung and line its compartment within the thorax on each side; the layers enclose between them the pleural cavity, a 'space' normally occupied only by a thin fluid film; this holds the lungs expanded against their elastic recoil, so that chest wall and lungs move together during the breathing cycle, but allows some sliding movement between them. The lung collapses if the layers become separated by entry of air (pneumothorax). Figure 1.

pleura (plerˑ·),

n one of the two thin, serous membranes that comprise a singular layer of flat mesothelial cells that encloses and lines the lungs. The outer layer, the parietal pleura encases the diaphragm and lines the wall of the chest. The inner layer, the visceral pleura, encases the lungs. Minute amounts of fluid are present between the two layers and serve as a lubricant while the lungs contract and expand during respiration.

pleura (plŏŏr´ə),

n a delicate serous membrane enclosing the lung, composed of a single layer of flattened mesothelial cells resting on a delicate membrane of connective tissue.

pleura

pl. pleurae [Gr.] the serous membrane investing the lungs (pulmonary pleura) and lining the walls of the thoracic cavity (parietal pleura), the two layers enclosing a potential space, the pleural cavity.
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It provides protection to the organs of the pleura, pertitoneum, and pericardium by secreting serous fluid which acts as a lubricant.
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A longitudinal view of the transverse process and its tip should be displayed medially, with the pleura lateral and slightly deeper.
Fibrinous adhesions were disrupted and parietal and visceral pleura were debrided in order to unify the pleural space.
Presented in sections on the chest wall, pleura, and mediastinum; pulmonary opacities; and hyperlucent abnormalities, the images include pleural effusions, anterior mediastinal mass, segmental and lobar opacities, multiple nodules and masses, and hyperlucent thorax.
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