pleiotropy


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Related to pleiotropy: pleiotropism, epistasis

pleiotropy

 [pli-ot´rŏ-pe]
the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects. The term is often used to refer to a single gene defect that is expressed as problems in multiple systems of the body, such as in osteogenesis imperfecta, where the gene causes defects in several different systems that contain collagen.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rō-pē, plī-ō-trō'pē-ă),
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]

pleiotropy

/plei·ot·ro·py/ (-pe) the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects.pleiotrop´ic

pleiotropy

(plī-ŏt′rə-pē) also

pleiotropism

(-pĭz′əm)
n. Biology
The production of diverse effects, especially the production by a single gene of several distinct and seemingly unrelated phenotypic effects.

plei′o·tro′pic (plī′ə-trō′pĭk, -trŏp′ĭk) adj.

pleiotropy

[plī·ot′rəpē]
Etymology: Gk, pleion, more, trepein to turn
the production by a single gene of a complex of unrelated phenotypic effects. The effects may be a manifestation of a particular disorder, such as the cluster of symptoms in Marfan's syndrome; aortic aneurysm; dislocation of the optic lens; skeletal deformities; and arachnodactyly, any or all of which may be present. pleiotropic, adj.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rŏ-pē, -ō-trō'pē-ă)
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]

pleiotropism, pleiotropy

the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inflammaging (inflammation + aging): A driving force for human aging based on an evolutionarily antagonistic pleiotropy theory?
Pleiotropy, natural selection, and the evolution of senescence.
with effects of pleiotropy of one gene or of multiple genes that are clustered together in the QTL region.
Moreover, if the organism has a flexibility in allocating some of its limited resources over time, then following an argument proposed in the Antagonistic Pleiotropy Theory of Williams (1957), the organism will disproportionately allocate resources to when it is young at the expense of having fewer resources when it is old.
Because these transcription factors are responsible for regulation of pleiotropy of proinflammatory mediators in many cell types, including epithelial cells, (7-10) it is likely that they contribute to epithelial cell dysfunction seen in patients with ALI/ARDS (Figure 8).
These studies promise new insights into the genetic basis of continuous traits and enhanced opportunities for revealing pleiotropy, although low power remains an issue--especially for the detection of non-additive gene-environment interactions (46,47).
Evidence for statin pleiotropy in humans: differential effects of statins and ezetimibe on rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase activity, endothelial function, and inflammation.
Pleiotropy, natural selection and the evolution of senescence.
Among his topics are scale matters, dominance, pleiotropy, epistatis, populations and natural selection and pathworks.
About 50 years ago, George Williams (13) published what has been called the antagonistic pleiotropy theory which hypothesizes that a gene that may have a positive impact on several traits (pleiotropy) may actually lead to detrimental effects by affecting fitness in a negative manner (antagonistic) at a later stage in life.
Identifying specific genes is further complicated by incomplete penetrance, pleiotropy (multiple effects of a single gene), and epistatic interactions (several genes interacting in the same individuals) [115].
Some gerontologists speculate that a better understanding of antagonistic pleiotropy might reveal much about what aging is, and how cellular senescence contributes to it.