plastid


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plastid

 [plas´tid]
1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast or amyloplast.

plas·tid

(plas'tid),
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes take place; plasid contain DNA and are self-replicating. Synonym(s): trophoplast
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter, food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, trichocysts, etc., in cells.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell, such as κ particles in certain paramecia.
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

(plăs′tĭd)
n.
Any of several cytoplasmic organelles, such as chloroplasts, that contain genetic material, have a double membrane, and are often pigmented. Plastids are found in plants, algae, and certain other eukaryotic organisms and have various physiological functions, such as the synthesis and storage of food.

plas·tid′i·al (plăs-tĭd′ē-əl) adj.

plas·tid

(plas'tid)
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes are carried on; contain DNA and are self replicating.
Synonym(s): trophoplast.
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter in cells: food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, and trichocysts.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell (e.g., kappa particles in certain paramecia).
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

an organelle of plant cells, with a double membrane. Plastids are large (between 3 and 6 μ m in diameter) and have various roles, e.g. a photosynthetic function (CHLOROPLAST) or a storage function (AMYLOPLAST).

plastid

1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast, mitochondria or amyloplast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polypeptide profile of plastids isolated from seedlings grown under different light conditions was studied by SDS-PAGE.
Both mitochondria and plastids are bacterial in size and shape.
The article will also appear in the April 2011 print edition of the journal focused on plastid biology.
Phylogenetic studies in section Petota, including plastid DNA
Now Keeling and colleagues have sequenced the plastid genome of Chromera and found features that were passed down to both apicomplexan and dinoflagellate plastids, linking the two lineages.
Phylogeny of Bromelioideae (Bromeliaceae) infered from nuclear and plastid DNA loci reveals the evolution of the tank habit within the subfamily.
These efforts revealed that all six "pure" Neo-Tuberosum clones of the original populations generated by Simmonds and 33 varieties or breeders' lines with an Andigenum pedigree contain plastid DNA markers typical of Chilotanum germplasm.
She covers history, theory and practice of modern plant transformation techniques for both nuclear and plastid genomes, the generation of transgenic plants, the engineering of plant virus expression vectors for transient expression of vaccine proteins and other therapeutics, the role of glycosylation in the production of plant-made mammalian proteins, the basis of mucosal immunity using plant-based oral vaccines, the scale-up of plant-derived vaccine and therapeutic proteins in entire crops or large batch cell suspension cultures, the development of clinical trials, the immune response to plant-derived pharmaceuticals, and risks and biosafety.
Phylogenetics of Miscanthus, Saccharum and related genera (Saccharinae, Andropogoneae, Poaceae) based on DNA sequences from ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA and plastid trnL intron and trnL-F intergenic spacers.
The new study at UF's Florida Museum of Natural History analyzed 86 complete plastid genome sequences from a wide range of plant species.