plasticity


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plasticity

 [plas-tis´ĭ-te]
the quality of being plastic, or capable of being molded.

plas·tic·i·ty

(plas-tis'i-tē),
The capability of being formed or molded; the quality of being plastic.

plasticity

(plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē)
n.
The ability to change and adapt, especially the ability of the central nervous system to acquire alternative pathways for sensory perception or motor skills.

plasticity

[plastis′itē]
Etymology: Gk, plassein, to mold
the quality of being plastic or formative.

plas·tic·i·ty

(plas-tis'i-tē)
The capability of being formed or molded; the quality of being plastic.

plasticity

The ability of nervous system to be functionally modified as a result of repetitive activation. Thus the formation of functional links between the retina and the visual cortex in early infancy require the exercise of the visual function. If for any reason one eye is not used during the first six or seven years of life (the period of plasticity) that eye will remain effectively blind.

plasticity,

n 1. the correlation between the physical structure of an object and the way it moves.
2. the ability of a tissue or organism to change and adapt.

plas·tic·i·ty

(plas-tis'i-tē)
Capability of being formed or molded; quality of being plastic.

plasticity (plastis´itē),

n 1. the quality of being moldable or workable.
n 2. the degree of permanent deformation resulting from stress application, usually associated with substances that are classed as solids or semirigid liquids.

plasticity

the quality of being plastic, or capable of being molded.

nervous system plasticity
the ability of the nervous system to change its capabilities by experience; plays a major role in compensating for the loss of neurons with age.
References in periodicals archive ?
As recently as a decade ago, scientists thought that loss of vital brain plasticity was inevitable due to age.
corticosterone, dopamine, and serotonin) can influence striatal plasticity, a functional link clearly exists between the extended amygdala and the striatum.
These experiments fall into two categories, those testing frequency-dependent plasticity and those testing spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP).
The variations of Atterberg limits in all boreholes show that the variation of plastic limit values shows less variation than liquid limit, therefore plasticity index is affected mostly by liquid limit.
In rodent models Dudek noticed that a particular gene, TREK-1, was highly expressed in a layer of the adult visual cortex that wasn't particularly plastic, and that its expression appeared to increase as the animal aged and the critical period for plasticity in that region closed.
At the outset of 'Variations I, for Jacques Derrida' (Chapter 1), Malabou tells us that her book outlines a movement by which the concept of plasticity gradually asserts itself as the style of an era.
2, temperature course of index of plasticity is in Fig.
The aim of this work is to overcome the deficiencies of the previous models such as, mesh dependency, nonobjectivity of the numerical response and strain localization encountered by using general softening plasticity models [13-15].
Analysis of the relationship of the variation of plasticity and strength at the temperatures of transition to the solid-liquid state shows an inflection point on the strength curve for both alloys.
The book, Blindness and Brain Plasticity in Navigation and Object Perception, edited by John J.
Although the mechanisms mediating this recovery are not fully understood, activity-dependent plasticity likely plays a major role.