plaster of Paris


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plaster

 [plas´ter]
1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an analgesic or local vasodilator.
plaster of Paris calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts, and in dentistry for making study models.

plas·'ter of Par·is

exsiccated calcium sulfate from which the water of crystallization has been expelled by heat, but which, when mixed with water, will form a paste that subsequently sets.

plaster of Paris

n.
Any of a group of gypsum cements, essentially hemihydrated calcium sulfate, CaSO4· 1/2 H2O, a white powder that forms a paste when it is mixed with water and then hardens into a solid, used in making casts, molds, and sculpture.

plaster of paris

Etymology: Gk, emplastron, plaster; Paris, France
a white powder, calcium sulfate hemihydrate, that is mixed with water to make a paste that can be molded to encase a body part.

plas·ter of Par·is

(plas'tĕr par'is)
Any of a group of gypsum cements, essentially hemihydrated calcium sulfate, a white powder that forms a paste when mixed with water and then hardens into a solid; used in making casts, molds, and sculpture.
[L. plastrum, plaster + Paris, France]

plaster of Paris

A white powder of dried calcium sulphate dihydrate which, mixed with water, gives off heat and hardens. Reinforced with loose bandage it forms a strong and useful support (CAST) or dental mould.

Paris,

city in France.
plaster of Paris - a gypsum material used for making casts.

plaster of Paris

; PoP powdered, exsiccated calcium sulphate hemihydrate; sets hard when mixed to a thick paste with cold water, taking on the exact contours of its containing mould

plas·ter of Par·is

(plas'tĕr par'is)
Exsiccated calcium sulfate from which water of crystallization has been expelled by heat, but which, when mixed with water, forms a paste that then sets.
[L. plastrum, plaster + Paris, France]

plaster

1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an anodyne or rubefacient.

plaster cast
see cast (5).
plaster of Paris
calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts.
plaster rolls
the dry material for constructing plaster casts is packaged as rolls of impregnated gauze which is thoroughly soaked in water before being applied by unrolling around the site of the fracture.
plaster shears
special shears to cut plaster of Paris casts. Designed to cut upwards away from the tissues to avoid injury. Called also plaster scissors, Esmarch plaster shears.
plaster spreader
a reverse pincer device with flat blades that are fitted down into a cut made in a plaster cast that is to be removed. Opening the handles forces the plaster apart.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next step was to cover the armature with small plaster of Paris strips.
Kevin Clark / The Register-Guard Toyu puts mineral oil on Aimee Yogi's face in preparation for the plaster of Paris impression.
Use the spoon to fill cup 1 two-thirds full With a mixture of sand, soil, and plaster of Paris.
Most of the images obtained are for hydrating portland cement pastes, with a few data sets representing hydrating Plaster of Paris and a common building brick.
Then Mother recalled that back at VBS, a fellow worker had brought a sack of plaster of paris for a handicraft activity
Making plaster of paris animal track casts is a classic camp activity that was presented in the September/October issue of Camping Magazine.
And in walked a grinning forester with a plaster of Paris tiger track made by a one-and-a-halfyear-old tiger.
Cover one side of the fossil or bone with a cast made of plaster of Paris, tissue paper, and burlap; let the cast dry.
a Brontosaur: nine bones and six hundred barrels of plaster of Paris.
With an adult's help, mix plaster of Paris and water according to the directions on the container.
Napoleon's doctors wrapped injured limbs in bandages soaked in plaster of Paris.
The plaster of Paris replica of the Statue of Liberty prominently faces the street.