plasma cell dyscrasia

plas·ma cell dys·cra·si·a

A diverse group of diseases characterized by the proliferation of a single clone of cells producing a monoclonal immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragment (a serum M component). The cells usually have plasma cell morphology, but may have lymphocytic or lymphoplasmacytic morphology. This group includes multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, the heavy chain disease, benign monoclonal gammopathy, and immunocytic amyloidosis.

plasma cell dyscrasia

A lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by monoclonal proliferation of plasma cells, with clinical behavior ranging from innocuous extramedullary plasmacytomas to premalignant solitary plasmacytoma of bone to myeloma. Cf Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, Myeloma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her medical history was significant for extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, plasma cell dyscrasia and amyloidosis diagnosed one year earlier following biopsy of a right cheek mass.
7] This uncommon form of plasma cell dyscrasia is the most aggressive variant of all the monoclonal gammopathies and is defined as >20% plasma cells in peripheral blood or absolute plasma cell count >2x[10.
Exclusion of a plasma cell dyscrasia requires further clinical consideration and laboratory testing.
A normocellular microscopical appearance, with no plasma cell dyscrasia, was displayed on the bone marrow aspirate.
We report five patients with plasma cell dyscrasia, four had C3GP and one had DDD proven by kidney biopsies.
POEMS syndrome is a underlying plasma cell dyscrasia related paraneoplastic syndrome and CD is one of the major criteria in the diagnosis of this disease.
What type of plasma cell dyscrasia is associated with these results?
In addition, SLE and SS are also associated with some plasma cell dyscrasias, such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, macroglobulinemia, and amyloidosis; however, multiple myeloma (MM) as a lymphoproliferative neoplasm and plasma cell dyscrasia are not nearly as common.
Therefore, there is a need to reconsider the role of intravascular contrast media as risk factor in patients with malignant plasma cell dyscrasia.
Plasma cell dyscrasia (PCD) is a generic term for neoplastic lesions, which include monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), multiple myeloma (MM), plasmacytoma, and monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease.
Most cases of plasma cell dyscrasia are diagnosed without Flow cytometry; however, it may be useful in certain patients with hematologic abnormalities and an elevated level of plasma cells in the bone marrow and without specific clinical manifestations (3).
Therefore, a diagnosis of LCDD of the liver and bone marrow with plasma cell dyscrasia was made.