pitchblende


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Related to pitchblende: radium

pitch·blende

(pich'blend),
A mineral of pitchlike appearance, chiefly uranium dioxide, the main source of uranium and elements, such as radium, produced as a result of the radioactive breakdown of that element.
Synonym(s): uraninite

pitchblende

(pĭch′blĕnd)
Uraninite, the principal source of uranium. It is a mineral that resembles pitch.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Marie meanwhile took on the herculean task of isolating radium from pitchblende.
A synthetic mixture of Pitchblende ore was prepared by mixing in the same ratio, as the components would be present in Pitchblende ore.
The main uranium-ore stage characterized by the formation of coffinite and pitchblende was dated by the U/Pb method (Anderson et al.
1] A 1946 stamp shows a photograph of Great Bear Lake, NWT, where pitchblende was discovered by Gilbert A.
In 1789 uranium oxide was extracted from pitchblende, a uranium-containing ore discovered in Bohemia.
From 1930 to 1960 the pitchblende deposits at the eastern tip of the Great Bear Lake, where the town of Port Radium was built from scratch, were exploited to obtain radium and other radioactive elements.
I'm not a stellar performer when it comes to killing pitchblende targets, but the new Orion Upland made hitting easy.
On February 17th, 1898, she tested a sample of heavy black pitchblende (a naturally-occurring mineral containing uranium) which she found was emitting unexpectedly strong radiation.
He scoured hundreds of miles of upper Michigan in his Pontiac looking for "hot rocks" with his Geiger counter, but all he could find was a quarter trunkload of pitchblende on the shores of Lake Huron.
Later Joachimsthal (or Jachymov) was famous as the source of the pitchblende ore from which radium was first isolated, and subsequently was an important uranium producer.
Imagine the shock, disbelief, and exhilaration in that order--that rocked the scientific community in the waning years of the 19th century when science had just concluded that transmutations were nothing more than wistful dreams: Wilhelm Roentgen discovered x rays in 1895, which Lord Kelvin--with an R&D attitude that was well ahead of its time--dismissed out of hand as a charlatan's trick; then this was followed by Henri Becquerel's discovery of x-ray-like activity in uranium two years later, with the subsequent discovery and separation of polonium and radium from pitchblende ore by Pierre and Marie Curie by 1898.