pinprick test

pinprick test

a test of a person's ability to detect a cutaneous pain sensation and to differentiate such sensations from pressure stimuli. The test is performed with a pin or needle gently applied to a skin area where it cannot be observed by the subject. The application of the pin is alternated with the pressing of a dull object against the skin. Care is taken to prevent penetration of the dermis, and the sharp object used should be sterilized or discarded after the test.

pinprick test

A test for cutaneous pain receptors. A small, clean, sharp object such as a pin or needle is gently applied to the skin and the patient is asked to describe the sensation. One must be certain the patient is reporting the sensation of pain rather than that of pressure. Usually, application of the sharp object is interspersed with application of a dull object, and the patient is asked to state each time whether a sharp or dull sensation was felt. The patient is not, of course, allowed to observe the test procedure.

CAUTION!

The sharp object should not penetrate the dermis, and to prevent passage of infectious material from one patient to another, the test objects should be either discarded after use or sterilized before their use on another patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
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