pinocytosis


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pinocytosis

 [pin″o-si-to´sis]
a mechanism by which cells ingest extracellular fluid and its contents; it involves the formation of invaginations by the cell membrane, which close and break off to form fluid-filled vacuoles in the cytoplasm (see accompanying illustration). adj., adj pinocytot´ic.
Mechanism of pinocytosis. Tiny droplets of fluid are trapped by the folds of the plasma membrane and engulfed as fluid-filled vesicles into the cytoplasm.

pin·o·cy·to·sis

(pin'ō-sī-tō'sis, pī'nō-),
The cellular process of actively engulfing liquid, a phenomenon in which minute incuppings or invaginations are formed in the surface of the cell membrane and close to form fluid-filled vesicles; it resembles phagocytosis.
[pinocyte + G. -osis, condition]

pinocytosis

/pino·cy·to·sis/ (pi″nah-si-to´sis) a mechanism by which cells ingest extracellular fluid and its contents; it involves the formation of invaginations by the cell membrane, which close and break off to form fluid-filled vacuoles in the cytoplasm.pinocytot´ic
Enlarge picture
Pinocytosis of small fluid droplets.

pinocytosis

(pĭn′ə-sĭ-tō′sĭs, -sī-, pī′nə-)
n.
Introduction of fluids into a cell by invagination of the cell membrane, followed by formation of vesicles within the cells.

pin′o·cy·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

pinocytosis

[pī′nōsītō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, pinein + kytos + osis, condition
the process by which extracellular fluid is taken into a cell. The plasma membrane develops a saccular indentation filled with extracellular fluid and then pinches off the indentation, forming a vesicle or vacuole of fluid within the cell.

pin·o·cy·to·sis

(pin'ō-sī-tō'sis)
The cellular process of actively engulfing liquid, a phenomenon in which minute incuppings or invaginations are formed in the surface of the cell membrane and close to form fluid-filled vesicles; it resembles phagocytosis.
[pinocyte + G. -osis, condition]
Enlarge picture
PINOCYTOSIS AND EXOCYTOSIS: (Top) Pinocytosis; (Bottom) Exocytosis
Enlarge picture
PINOCYTOSIS AND EXOCYTOSIS

pinocytosis

(pin″ŏ-sĭ-tō′sĭs, pīn″, -sī″) [ pinocyte + -osis]
The process by which cells absorb or ingest nutrients and fluid. An invaginating portion of the cell membrane encircles the nutrient, enclosing it in a membrane-bound sac. The contents of the sac are then digested.
See: illustrationillustration

pinocytosis

The process in which cells engulf fluid to form tiny clear spherical containers (vacuoles) which then move through the cell cytoplasm, sometimes acting as scavenging vehicles to be discarded through another part of the cell membrane. Extracellular fluid with dissolved molecules may be moved intracellularly by pinocytosis.

pinocytosis

or

micropinocytosis

(‘cell-drinking’) the active engulfing of very small particles or liquids by cells; a form of ENDOCYTOSIS. The particles become surrounded by the cell membrane on all sides, which eventually forms a channel from which vesicles are pinched off and move within the PROTOPLASM before their contents can be transferred into the cell proper.

pin·o·cy·to·sis

(pin'ō-sī-tō'sis)
The cellular process of actively engulfing liquid, a phenomenon in which minute incuppings or invaginations are formed in the surface of the cell membrane and close to form fluid-filled vesicles.
[pinocyte + G. -osis, condition]

pinocytosis (pī´nōsītō´sis),

pinocytosis

a mechanism by which cells ingest extracellular fluid and its contents; it involves the formation of invaginations by the cell membrane, which close and break off to form fluid-filled vacuoles in the cytoplasm.
Enlarge picture
Mechanism of pinocytosis. By permission from Guyton R, Hall JE, Textbook of Medical Physiology, Saunders, 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Botulinum toxins are taken up by nerve cells through pinocytosis and mediate their action by binding to neuromuscular junctions and preventing acetylcholine release leading to muscular paralysis (16).
Although milk proteins can be absorbed by mucosal cells of the gut in the early neonatal period by pinocytosis, this absorption decreases greatly beyond the neonatal period, owing to maturation of the intestinal cells (2).
Due to its small molecular size, cadmium-MT, in contrast to the cadmium-albumin complex, is efficiently filtered through the glomerular membrane and reabsorbed by renal tubular cells through pinocytosis.
Regulation of pinocytosis in murine macrophages by colony-stimulating factors and other agents.