pigment

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pigment

 [pig´ment]
1. any coloring matter of the body.
2. a stain or dyestuff.
3. a paintlike medicinal preparation applied to the skin. adj., adj pig´mentary.
bile pigment any of the coloring matters of the bile, derived from heme, including bilirubin, biliverdin, and several others.
blood pigment (hematogenous pigment) any of the pigments derived from hemoglobin, such as hematoidin, hematoporphyrin, hemofuscin, and methemoglobin.
lipid pigment any of various pigments having lipid characteristics, some of which also contain protein or iron, the most important one being lipofuscin.
respiratory p's substances, e.g., hemoglobin, myoglobin, or cytochromes, which take part in the oxidative processes of the animal body.
retinal p's the photopigments in retinal rods and cones that respond to certain colors of light and initiate the process of vision.

pig·ment

(pig'ment),
1. Any coloring matter, such as that in the red blood cells, hair, or iris, or in the stains used in histologic or bacteriologic work, or that in paint.
2. A medicinal preparation for external use, applied to the skin like paint, or coloring agents used in paints.
[L. pigmentum, paint]

pigment

/pig·ment/ (pig´mint)
1. any coloring matter of the body.
2. a stain or dyestuff.
3. a paintlike medicinal preparation to be applied to the skin.pig´mentary

bile pigment  any of the coloring matters of the bile, including bilirubin, biliverdin, etc.
blood pigment , hematogenous pigment any of the pigments derived from hemoglobin.
respiratory pigments  substances, e.g., hemoglobin, myoglobin, or cytochromes, which take part in the oxidative processes of the animal body.
retinal pigments , visual pigments the photopigments in retinal rods and cones that respond to certain colors of light and initiate the process of vision.

pigment

(pĭg′mənt)
n.
1. A substance used as coloring.
2. A substance, such as chlorophyll or melanin, that produces a characteristic color in plant or animal tissue.
tr.v. pig·mented, pig·menting, pig·ments
To color with pigment.

pig′men·tar′y (pĭg′mən-tĕr′ē) adj.

pigment

[pig′mənt]
Etymology: L, pigmentum, paint
1 any organic coloring material produced in the body, such as melanin.
2 any colored, paintlike medicinal preparation applied to the skin surface. pigmentary, pigmented, adj., pigmentation, n.

pigment

Dermatology A substance that imparts color to tissue–eg, skin, eyes, hair. See Accessory pigment, Bile pigment, Malarial pigment, Tattoo, Tyndall.

pig·ment

(pig'mĕnt)
1. Any coloring matter, as, for example, that of the red blood cells, hair, or iris, or the stains used in histologic or bacteriologic work, or that in paints.
2. A medicinal preparation for external use, applied to the skin like paint or coloring agents used in paints.
[L. pigmentum, paint]

pigment 

A coloured substance (e.g. haemoglobin, melanin) found in cells or tissue.
pigment dispersion syndrome See pigment dispersion syndrome.
pigment epithelium See retinal pigment epithelium.
macular pigment A yellow pigment, insensitive to light with a maximum absorption around 460 nm, and located in the inner layers of the macular area of the retina. It extends over an area of about 12º in diameter. Its density declines markedly with eccentricity. The major components of this pigment are the carotenoids: lutein and zeaxanthin. These yellow pigments absorb blue light maximally. The macular pigment has been thought to mitigate the effect of chromatic aberration and to protect the retina against short wavelength radiations. Moreover, lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants, which help protect the macula from oxidative stress, and larger plasma concentrations of these pigments may lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration. See red filter; macula lutea; oxidative stress.
visual pigment Photosensitive pigment contained in the outer segments of both rods and cones. The chemical composition of the pigment in both cells is almost the same, there is only a slight difference in the protein opsin. The pigment in the rods is called rhodopsin. The cones contain three other types of pigments (one in each cone), which have spectral absorption curves with a maximum around 420, 530 and 560 nm. These three pigments form the basis of normal trichromatic colour vision. Syn. for cone visual pigments: cyanolabe, chlorolabe and erythrolabe, names sometimes used for the short-wave, middle-wave and long-wave sensitive cone pigments, respectively. Absorption of light by the visual pigments and the subsequent chemical changes that result in photoreceptor potentials represents the first stage in the visual process. Note: erythrolabe, meaning red pigment, has, in fact, its maximum spectral absorption around 560 nm, which is in the green-yellow portion of the visible spectrum. See bleaching; cone cell; rod cell; defective colour vision; retinal densitometry; iodopsin; porphyropsin; rhodopsin; photostress test; trichromatism; Young-Helmholtz theory; transduction.
Table P4 Cone pigments in normal and congenital dichromatic colour vision defects (excluding cases due to anomalies of the central visual pathway)
colour visionlong-wave sensitive (around 560 nm)middle-wave sensitive (around 530 nm)short-wave sensitive (around 420 nm)
normalpresentpresentpresent
protanopeabsent or abnormalpresentpresent
deuteranopepresentabsent or abnormalpresent
tritanopepresentpresentabsent or abnormal

pig·ment

(pig'mĕnt)
1. Any coloring matter, such as that in the red blood cells, hair, or iris, or in the stains used in histologic or bacteriologic work, or that in paint.
2. A medicinal preparation for external use, applied to the skin like paint.
[L. pigmentum, paint]

pigment

1. any coloring matter of the body.
2. a stain or dyestuff.
3. a paintlike medicinal preparation applied to the skin.

abnutzen pigment
bile pigment
any one of the coloring matters of the bile, derived from heme, including bilirubin, biliverdin, etc.
blood pigment
any one of the pigments derived from hemoglobin, including heme, hematoidin, etc.
pigment cells
pigment-enhancing media
formulated to promote the production of pigment by some bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Rhodococcus equi, to aid in identification.
pigment genes
genes for each of the coat colors, e.g. white gene, black gene, orange gene.
respiratory p's
substances, e.g. hemoglobin, myoglobin or cytochromes, which take part in the oxidative processes of the animal body.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the mid-range color segment for reds, LANXESS offers the new pigments Bayferrox 520, Bayferrox 5272, Bayferrox 525 and Bayferrox 530.
Based on our experimental results and theoretical calculations, we are optimistic that we will be able to expand the current color limits of iron oxide red pigments in the near future, says Kathrein.
Lanxess has been working with various concrete products industries for decades and our technical presenters have more than 65 combined years of experience working with inorganic pigments in the construction industry," said IPG Americas Region Vice President Hans-Peter Baldus.
The continually increasing importance of iron oxide pigments is based on their non-toxicity, chemical stability, wide variety of colors (ranging from yellow, orange, red, and brown to black), and good performance-price ratio.
Clarke developed an ink using a pigment and a reactive polymer so that the pigment and polymer remain soluble without additional dispersants.
The new global business unit will fully concentrate on the pigments business and thus be even more focused on supporting the needs of our pigments customers," said Dr.
Pigments fall into two classes: inorganic (transition metal-based) and organic (containing carbon-carbon bonds and usually derived from petroleum).
Rightfit Yellow 1220 is a green-shade yellow azo pigment that is reportedly heat-stable to 500 F in masstone, 525 F in dark tints, and 550 F in light tints.
They found that plants that can make red pigments continue to absorb nutrients from their leaves long after the mutant plants have stopped.
Demands for anti-counterfeiting and security items will increase the need for luminescent pigments.
The yellowish pigments that give the visible glow are called betaxanthins.
Tony Lyons, director of research, IMERYS Pigments for Paper Business Group