physiology

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Related to physiologically: psychologically, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

physiology

 [fiz″e-ol´o-je]
1. the science that treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.
cell physiology the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology (pathologic physiology) the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

/phys·i·ol·o·gy/ (-je)
1. the science which treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.

morbid physiology , pathologic physiology the study of disordered function or of function in diseased tissues.

physiology

(fĭz′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts.
2. All the functions of a living organism or any of its parts.

phys′i·ol′o·gist n.

physiology

[fiz′ē·ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, physis + logos, science
1 the study of the processes and function of the human body.
2 the study of the physical and chemical processes involved in the functioning of organisms and their parts. Kinds of physiology include comparative physiology, developmental physiology, hominal physiology, and pathological physiology. Compare anatomy.

physiology

See Applied physiology, Cardiac electrophysiology, Clinical neurophysiology.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than as to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

The study of the functioning of living organisms, especially the human organism. Physiology includes BIOCHEMISTRY but this is such a large discipline that it is followed as a separate speciality. Together with ANATOMY and PATHOLOGY, physiology is the basis of medical science.

physiology

the study in animals, plants and microorganisms of those internal processes and functions associated with life.

physiology

the branch of biological science concerned with the normal bodily function of living organisms, hence physiologist. Also those functions themselves, as for example the physiology of digestion, of vision, of locomotion, etc. adj physiological.

physiology,

n in biological sciences, study concerned with the processes and functioning of organisms.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science concerned with normal vital processes of organisms, especially as to how things normally function in living organism rather than to their anatomic structure.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology (fiz´ēol´əjē),

n the study of tissue and organism behavior. The physiologic process is a dynamic state of tissue as compared with the static state of descriptive morphology (anatomy). Physiology is differentiated from descriptive morphology by the following qualifying properties: rate, direction, and magnitude. Physiologic processes are thus morphologic alterations in the three dimensions of space associated with a temporary (time) sequence. Physiologic processes relate to a wide spectrum of life activities on three levels: biochemical and biophysical activity of a subcellular nature, the activity of cells and tissues aggregated into organ systems, and multiorgan system activity as expressed in human behavior.
physiology, oral,
n the physiology related to clinical manifestations in the normal and abnormal behavior of oral structures. The principal clinical functions in which the oral structures participate are deglutition, mastication, respiration, speech, and head posture.

physiology

1. the science which deals with the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.

cell physiology
the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology, pathological physiology
the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
The COTONS[R] Model is a physiologically detailed simulation growth and development cotton model.
People continually communicate their conscious and subconscious thoughts physiologically, nonverbally, and verbally.
including Shunji Natori, a pharmaceutical professor at the University of Tokyo, said a physiologically active substance found in flies impedes the spread of two types of breast cancer and a skin cancer.
If you were to look at the electronic version, you'd be scanning, a physiologically different and more taxing way to read.
And from Dworkin: "Intercourse remains a means or the means of physiologically making a woman inferior.
The result is a physiologically relevant microenvironment that mimics the human vasculature and other organ systems where flow is present.
However, it is unknown if physiologically relevant, anthocyanin-containing whole foods confer similar effects to concentrated, anthocyanin extracts.
We have shown that SAP is bound by fibrils of amyloid beta and that this interaction stabilises the fibrils over timescales which are physiologically significant," said Exley.
In fact, most active substances produced in plants do not physiologically exist in a human body.
Baxter recalls that when, just a few days after arriving on campus, he first met Shuler, "we immediately saw a fit for miniaturized systems to make [Shuler's setups] more physiologically realistic.
So saying, since mirror-image couples are physiologically "unequipped" to consummate, so must pervert, ought not this severe impediment, of and by its nature, constitute the same invalidity, particularly in the case of a religious ceremony?
Humans aren't physiologically designed to eat meat.

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