physiognomy


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physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

/phys·i·og·no·my/ (fiz″e-og´nah-me)
1. determination of mental or moral character and qualities by the face.
2. the countenance, or face.
3. the facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

[fiz′ë·og′nəmē]
Etymology: Gk, physis, nature, gnosis, knowledge
a method of judging the personality and other characteristics of a client by studying the face and general carriage of the body.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy (fiz´ēog´nəmē),

facial features.
References in classic literature ?
The host, who was not endowed with great perspicacity, did not observe the expression which his words had given to the physiognomy of the stranger.
Full of this idea, Villefort's face became so joyous, that when he turned to Dantes, the latter, who had watched the change on his physiognomy, was smiling also.
Ilbrahim was the unconscious possessor of much skill in physiognomy, and it would have deterred him, in other circumstances, from attempting to make a friend of this boy.
Among the portraits was one of King George III Little Alice clapped her hands, and seemed pleased with the bluff good-nature of his physiognomy.
Within it, thrust partly out of the window, appeared the physiognomy of the old man, with a skin as yellow as if his own Midas-hand had transmuted it.
We were then, for reasons which it is not worth while to specify, in the close neighbourhood of Kerguelen Land; and now, when I open an atlas and look at the tiny dots on the map of the Southern Ocean, I see as if engraved upon the paper the enraged physiognomy of that gale.
She knew the physiognomy of every page, and could tell on what book she opened, sometimes on what chapter, without seeing title or number.
I employed the interval of silence in a rapid scrutiny of his physiognomy.
the duke, Gaston of Orleans, whose physiognomy, naturally rather majestic, had borrowed on this solemn occasion a fresh luster and a fresh dignity.
Indeed, a skilled eye could read so much in their physiognomy.
His eyes, which were gentle and intelligent, rather than bold, lent a peculiar charm to his physiognomy.
In the fifteenth century, Paris was still divided into three wholly distinct and separate towns, each having its own physiognomy, its own specialty, its manners, customs, privileges, and history: the City, the University, the Town.