physiognomy


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physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

/phys·i·og·no·my/ (fiz″e-og´nah-me)
1. determination of mental or moral character and qualities by the face.
2. the countenance, or face.
3. the facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

[fiz′ë·og′nəmē]
Etymology: Gk, physis, nature, gnosis, knowledge
a method of judging the personality and other characteristics of a client by studying the face and general carriage of the body.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy (fiz´ēog´nəmē),

facial features.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mohamed Bin Zayed Falconry and Desert Physiognomy School presents its curricula in English, which was among its main plans since its founding, and thankfully today we witness the graduation of the first group of girls who do not speak Arabic.
It is here that one is reminded of Montaigne's critique of learning in "Of physiognomy," where, after having introduced Socrates as the exemplar of natural virtue, he writes:
But a stylistic chameleon like Schrauwen resists this expressionist Rorschach test himself; rather, his restless experimentation with different visual approaches, married to his thematic concerns, implies a deeper investigation into the physiognomy of style.
The really catchy feature of the novel is the physiognomy game.
I propose that Fanny's interaction with the profile of Edmund would have brought to mind a particular connection between the profile portrait form and the recognition of "true character" in the study of physiognomy.
Physiognomy sometimes claimed to predict the future: this is what will happen to a man with this face.
Duncan's negative construal of physiognomy in Macbeth, "There's no art / To find the mind's construction in the face" (1.
A MONG the many tales of wisdom in Indian folklore is the story of a group of wise men in the kingdom of the blind trying to figure out what an elephant looked like with each touching a different part of the animal to arrive at his own conclusion about its physiognomy.
4% for the patient's physiognomy which was highest among female dentists (34.
for instance, in the popular science of physiognomy, which posited that
England's captain Keith Veryard, sporting a physiognomy that would make even Sam Weller blush, was as immodest in his victory speech as a modern-day Fagin with a pocket full of contents of other folk's pockets.