physiognomy

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physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

/phys·i·og·no·my/ (fiz″e-og´nah-me)
1. determination of mental or moral character and qualities by the face.
2. the countenance, or face.
3. the facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

[fiz′ë·og′nəmē]
Etymology: Gk, physis, nature, gnosis, knowledge
a method of judging the personality and other characteristics of a client by studying the face and general carriage of the body.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]
References in periodicals archive ?
In this particular case the bulk of the discussion is based almost exclusively on secondary literature (except for five lines of physiognomic omens on p.
These have shown that these forests have physiognomic and floristic similarities to the Indo-Malaysian rain forests and are a type of tropical Asian rain forest at the climatic limits on the northern edge of the tropical zone.
In the aforementioned mock handbill Kemble is already Catholic before he 'becomes' Jewish, and in KINGS PLACE & CHANDOS STREET Cruikshank subtly, if strikingly, uses physiognomic parallels to connect Kemble with the Jewish pugilist on the extreme right who sneaks up behind John Bull stating 'Vat Mr Bull I cot you'.
In Kitagawa Utamaro's "Fickle Type," from the series Ten Types in the Physiognomic Study of Women (1792-3), the subject seems too engrossed in staring off and absentmindedly playing with her luxuriant robe to notice her own exposed breast.
The first room of the exhibition is hung with pictures of his wife Suzanne Leenhoff and her illegitimate son Leon (who some people think was Manet's), which are more than physiognomic records.
Physiognomic structure and diversity--the following classical phytosociological parameters were calculated, as proposed by MUELLER-DOMBOIS & ELLEMBERG (1974): absolute density, absolute frequency and absolute dominance expressed by the basal area per hectare.
While it is apparent that vision and physiognomic features were important factors of colonialism, I suggest that the power produced by colonisation and the power produced by racism operated on very different criteria and, similarly, anti-racism and decolonial discourses are incompatible.
It is an important physiognomic attribute that has been widely used in vegetation studies.
The background describes, in physiognomic terms, the female body, that, in my opinion, is more erotic than maternal (the collina mammella, otherwise associated with the mother in Pavese's mythology, namely in Paesi tuoi): "Guardando verso Canelli (era una giornata colorita, serena), prendevo in un 'occhiata sola la piana del Belbo, Gaminella di fronte, il Salto di fianco, e la palazzina del Nido, rossa in mezzo ai suoi platani, profilata sulla costa dell 'estrema collina" (110).
Readers know, for example, that the grisette's quick physiognomic reading of La Goualeuse is a misreading and, by responding to what she sees rather than what is, she silences her friend who dates not contradict that which her own clothing so plainly, albeit dishonestly, declares.