physical self-esteem

physical self-esteem

a person's evaluation of their physical self, including evaluations of both physical appearance and physical competencies. Also known as physical self-worth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Physical exercises may increase the QL due to their mediating effects on self-efficacy, physical self-esteem and affection (Elavsky, 2009), in addition to positively change the way an individual physically sees himself/herself (Zanuso, Balducci, & Jimenez, 2009).
Therefore, many females perceive attractive bodies as essential during the emerging adult years and often strive to be perceived as attractive and beautiful, even though it may be potentially detrimental to their physical self-esteem.
The result is supported by Haugen, Safvenbom and Ommundsen's (2011) finding that the effect of physical activity on global self-worth, through physical self-esteem, was stronger for females.
Four subscales (physical condition, body attractiveness, strength esteem, and physical self-esteem) along with an overall score of physical self-esteem were calculated.
Exploring the relationship between daily steps, body mass index, and physical self-esteem in female Australian adolescents.
Specifically, physical self-esteem in general, and aspects relating to sport prowess and appearance, were highly valued in predominantly individualist societies, while aspects relating to fitness were highly valued in cultures with high collectivist norms (Hagger, Asci, & Lindwall, 2004).
In relation to the AF5 self-esteem measure, research has shown that boys tend to have higher emotional and physical self-esteem than girls (Garaigordobil, Dura, & Perez, 2005; Garcia & Musitu, 1999), resulting from a higher prevalence of emotional and physical-image problems in women (e.
CHILDREN at specialist sports colleges may develop significantly higher physical self-esteem than those at traditional state schools, a study claims.
Children at specialist sports colleges may develop much higher physical self-esteem compared to those at traditional State schools, a study said today.
Children at specialist sports colleges may develop significantly higher physical self-esteem compared to those at traditional state schools, according to research carried out in the North.
However, a limitation may have been that physical self-esteem or self-presentation confidence may have been more appropriate constructs since they are multidimensional and contain dimensions more relevant to physical concept assessment (i.
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