phototropism


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phototropism

 [fo-tot´ro-pizm]
1. tropism of an organism in response to light; it may be either positive (toward the light) or negative (away from the light).
2. change of color produced in a substance by the action of light. adj., adj phototrop´ic.

pho·tot·ro·pism

(fō-tot'rō-pizm),
Movement of a part of an organism toward (positive phototropism) or away from (negative phototropism) the stimulus of light. Compare: phototaxis.
[photo- + G. tropē, a turning]

phototropism

/pho·tot·ro·pism/ (fo-tot´rah-pizm)
1. the tendency of an organism to turn or move toward or away from light.
2. color change produced in a substance by the action of light.phototrop´ic

phototropism

(fō-tŏt′rə-pĭz′əm, fō′tō-trō′-)
n.
Growth or movement of a sessile organism toward or away from a source of light.

pho′to·tro′pic (fō′tə-trō′pĭk) adj.

pho·tot·ro·pism

(fō-tot'rŏ-pizm)
Movement of a part of an organism toward (positive phototropism) or away from (negative phototropism) the stimulus of light.
Compare: phototaxis
[photo- + G. tropē, a turning]

phototropism

a bending growth movement of parts of a plant in response to a light stimulus. The movement produced by unequal growth is due to differences in AUXIN concentration. For example, most seedlings are positively phototropic, growing towards a light stimulus, because there is a greater concentration of auxin on the side furthest away from the light, giving greater growth on this side. Roots, on the other hand, are often negatively phototropic, growing away from a light source.

phototropism 

Reaction of certain plants and animals to move towards (positive phototropism) or away from (negative phototropism) a source of light.

phototropism

1. the tendency of an organism to turn or move toward (positive phototropism) or away from (negative phototropism) light.
2. change of color produced in a substance by the action of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was found that when several of the PIN and kinase components were missing, plant growth was completely unresponsive to the light signals that trigger phototropism.
Gravitropism and Phototropism of the Internodal Cells of Chara corallina.
Phototropism is an involuntary orientation in which a light is an orienting stimulus.
The phototropism of the flight of bees is the example discussed there.
A different method of some vines, mostly adventitious root climbers, is to use a process called skototropism or negative phototropism in which they grow toward dark surfaces until they find a potential support structure (Hegarty, 1991).
Most plant species from algae to flowering plants use blue light for inducing phototropism and chloroplast movement (Campbell and Liscum, 2001; Sakai et al.