photosynthesis


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photosynthesis

 [fo″to-sin´thĕ-sis]
a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light. adj., adj photosynthet´ic.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis),
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

/pho·to·syn·the·sis/ (fo″to-sin´thĭ-sis) a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically, the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxoide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light.photosynthet´ic

photosynthesis

(fō′tō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs)
n.
The process in green plants and certain other organisms by which carbohydrates are synthesized from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (usually water), using light as an energy source. Most forms of photosynthesis release oxygen as a byproduct.

pho′to·syn·thet′ic (-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
pho′to·syn·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

photosynthesis

[fōtōsin′thəsis]
Etymology: Gk, phos + synthesis, putting together
a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria containing chlorophyll synthesize organic compounds, chiefly carbohydrates, from atmospheric carbon dioxide and water, using light for energy and liberating oxygen in the process. photosynthetic, adj.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis)
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide and water into organic chemicals using the energy of light, with the release of oxygen. Photosynthesis occurs in green plants which are known as AUTOTROPHS. CYANOBACTERIA also carry out photosynthesis. See LIGHT REACTIONS and CALVIN CYCLE.

photosynthesis (fōˈ·tō·sinˑ·th·sis),

n metabolic process by which plants and some bacteria use carbon dioxide and sunlight to produce glucose. Oxygen is a by product of this process.

photosynthesis

a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
As we reveal the building blocks that make up CAM photosynthesis, we will be able to bioengineer the metabolic processes of water-heavy crops such as rice, wheat, soybeans, and poplar to accelerate their adaptation to water-limited environments.
Electrodes measure oxygen in short incubations in dark and clear chambers to compare photosynthesis and respiration rates.
The first step in natural photosynthesis is to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, which is released as a by-product.
It is this complexity, which makes photosynthesis such an ideal science topic to teach in the classroom.
The rise of malate contents in treated leaves suggested that exogenous malate could affect leaf photosynthesis.
In natural photosynthesis, the oxygen- evolving complex performs this reaction by accumulating reducing equivalents (electrons) in a manganese-calcium cluster within photosystem II (PS II), and then delivers them to water molecules [11, 12], with the resulting production of molecular oxygen and protons:
Results of the center's initial five years of research include characterization tools and automated high-throughput experimentation that can quickly make and screen large libraries of materials to identify components for artificial photosynthesis systems.
CO2 is a limiting substrate for photosynthesis in C3 crops, which include wheat and rice.
However, there was no significant difference of photosynthesis between control and fertilized groups, thus the changes in reflectance properties may be unrelated to photosynthesis.
But an Agricultural Research Service scientist and an international team of researchers have in fact sent algae into a low Earth orbit to study the effects of space on photosynthesis and plant growth.
While untold numbers of plants have carried out photosynthesis for hundreds of millions of years, the nature of this subtle process continues to elude us.
In our study, 1mM copper significantly inhibited the photosynthesis and plant growth of both two cultivars.