photosynthate


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to photosynthate: photorespiration

photosynthate

(fō′tō-sĭn′thāt)
n.
A chemical product of photosynthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the host plant allocates a significant amount of its photosynthates (Smith and Read, 1997) to the fungal symbionts to support almost entirely their metabolism, growth and formation of their fruit bodies, the ECM fungi transfer essential nutrients (mainly N, P and K) to the host.
One speculation is that the plant, when treated with SA, has reduced photosynthate allocated to the production of secondary compounds such as jasmonic acid, so that more photosynthate is available for allocation to biomass.
Loveys BR Tyerman SD and Loveys BR (2001) Transfer of photosynthate and naturally occurring insecticidal compounds from host plants to the root hemiparasite Santalum acuminatum (Santalaceae).
The harvest index the harvested fraction of total above ground photosynthate, increased roughly 45 percent.
Scientists estimate that the originally domesticated wheats devoted roughly 20 percent of their photosynthate to the development of seeds; they were stalk-heavy, harvest-light.
At current atmospheric levels of CO2, up to half of the photosynthate in C3 plants is typically lost and returned to the air by a process called photo-respiration, which occurs simultaneously with photosynthesis in sunlight.
2013); (it) have higher root: shoot ratios and thus greater transfer of photosynthate to belowground biomass (Reeder et al.
Studies of the moss placenta were significant in physiological and autoradiographic experiments demonstrating the function of transfer cells in facilitating transport of photosynthate in plants (Browning & Gunning, 1979a, b).
Studies on the comparative physiology and timing of photosynthate storage and retrieval of these plant assemblages together with xylem characteristics would be of interest.
These factors can affect hormonal balance, especially by changing the direction of the photosynthate supply to certain organs during times of great demand (dANTAS et al.
If one applies the model of the carbon-nutrient hypothesis to heartwood extractive formation, treating heartwood extractives as "carbon-based defensive compounds," then one would predict that silvicultural manipulations that increase nutrient availability more than they increase photosynthate accumulation (e.