photorefractive


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photorefractive

 [fo″to-re-frak´tiv]
pertaining to the refraction of light; see photorefractive keratectomy.

photorefractive

/pho·to·re·frac·tive/ (-re-frak´tiv) pertaining to the refraction of light.

photorefractive

[fo′to-re-frak′tiv]
pertaining to the refraction of light. See also photorefractive keratectomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
O'Connor J O'Keefe M Condon PI Twelve-year Follow-up of Photorefractive Keratectomy for Low to Moderate Myopia J Refract Surg.
Additionally, using a single-laser system for writing the images onto the photorefractive polymer, the researchers can display visuals in color.
In January, Wilford Hall Medical Center at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, started a photorefractive keratectorny center catering to active duty Air Force people.
Implants would serve as a less permanent alternative to corrective surgical techniques such as radial keratotomy or photorefractive keratectomy.
Salz, Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA), has been a principal investigator in the original FDA trials of photorefractive keratectomy for correction of nearsightedness and in subsequent trials for the photorefractive keratectomy and LASIK correction of farsightedness.
Approved procedures include radial keratotomy (RK), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and more recently, intra-corneal rings.
The instrument has been found safe and effective for photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) correction of myopia (nearsightedness) ranging from -0.
3 million procedures since FDA approval of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in late 1995.
Coverage also includes understanding and treating refractive, eye movement, and alignment disorders, and disorders of the cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, iris, pupil, macula, optic nerve, retina, vitreous, and uvea, such as cataracts, conjunctivitis, pink eye, macular degeneration, uveitis, iritis, vitreous detachment, floaters, and glaucoma, and eyeglasses and contact lenses, LASIK and LASEK surgery, photorefractive keratectomy surgery, and phakic intraocular lenses.
Empirical studies of photorefraction in polymers have often been based on assumptions of comparability between polymers and photorefractive crystals.
With PRK, or photorefractive keratectomy, the surgeon cuts away at the surface of the cornea.
Now, Klaus Meerholz, a materials scientist at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and his colleagues report a new photorefractive polymer that comes the closest so far to overcoming these hurdles.