photon


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photon

 [fo´ton]
a discrete particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

pho·ton (hν, γ),

(fō'ton),
In physics, a corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

/pho·ton/ (fo´ton) a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

photon

(fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.

photon

[fō′ton]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light
the smallest quantity of electromagnetic energy. It has no mass and no charge but travels at the speed of light. Photons may occur in the form of x-rays, gamma rays, or quanta of light. The energy (E) of a photon is expressed as the product of its frequency (v) and Planck's constant (h), as in the equation E = hv. X-ray photons occur in frequencies of 1018 to 1021 Hz and energies that range upward from 1 KeV.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
physics A corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

a quantum of radiant energy with a wavelength in the visible range of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.

Photon

A light particle.

photon 

The basic unit of radiant energy defined by the equation
E = hν
where h is Planck's constant (6.62 ✕ 10−34 joule ✕ second), ν the frequency of the light and E the energy difference carried away by the emission of a single photon of light. The term photon usually refers to visible light whereas the term quantum refers to other electromagnetic radiations. See quantum theory; wave theory; troland.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
In physics, corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon (fō´ton),

n a bullet or quantum of electromagnetic radiant energy emitted and propagated from various types of radiation sources. The term should not be used alone but should be qualified by terms that will clarify the type of energy (e.g., light photon, radiographic photon).

photon

a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

x-ray photon
a particle of x-ray energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the idea that cell tower photons could make you sick does not seem plausible to me.
Alice has sacrificed the two photons in her possession, but as a result, Bob now has an exact copy of the original photon, photon X.
In the delayed-choice experiment, a photon enters from the left, meets a beam splitter and, like a particle, takes one of two paths.
To contact the PHOTON Consulting team, please visit Booth 5826 in Kentia Hall during the exhibition or write to info@photonconsulting.
2], it follows that the total number of photons radiated is given by the formula
At Northwestern, a research team is making devices that manipulate bits of light, called photons, instead of the electrons that are the basis for today's computing industry.
Contact PHOTON Consulting at info@photonconsulting.
By completing both rounds of measurements, the physicists proved that they could manipulate the final particle so that its polarization and orbital angular momentum perfectly matched those of the original photon.
To request a detailed report summary of PHOTON Consulting's 2010 True Cost report, visit: http://www.
Gaponov and Khafizov calculated the photon energy spectrum and branching ratio within a quantum electrodynamics framework [2], while Bernard et al.
The Wall is a powerful and vital information tool that provides strategic managers access to nearly any piece of solar industry data at their fingertips," stated PHOTON Consulting's Managing Director, Michael Rogol.
Deny Hamel of Canada's University of Waterloo and colleagues have removed this limitation by using crystals that split one photon into two.