photon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

photon

 [fo´ton]
a discrete particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

pho·ton (hν, γ),

(fō'ton),
In physics, a corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

/pho·ton/ (fo´ton) a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

photon

(fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.

photon

[fō′ton]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light
the smallest quantity of electromagnetic energy. It has no mass and no charge but travels at the speed of light. Photons may occur in the form of x-rays, gamma rays, or quanta of light. The energy (E) of a photon is expressed as the product of its frequency (v) and Planck's constant (h), as in the equation E = hv. X-ray photons occur in frequencies of 1018 to 1021 Hz and energies that range upward from 1 KeV.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
physics A corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

a quantum of radiant energy with a wavelength in the visible range of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.

Photon

A light particle.

photon 

The basic unit of radiant energy defined by the equation
E = hν
where h is Planck's constant (6.62 ✕ 10−34 joule ✕ second), ν the frequency of the light and E the energy difference carried away by the emission of a single photon of light. The term photon usually refers to visible light whereas the term quantum refers to other electromagnetic radiations. See quantum theory; wave theory; troland.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
In physics, corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon (fō´ton),

n a bullet or quantum of electromagnetic radiant energy emitted and propagated from various types of radiation sources. The term should not be used alone but should be qualified by terms that will clarify the type of energy (e.g., light photon, radiographic photon).

photon

a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

x-ray photon
a particle of x-ray energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact -- an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers.
He calls the experiment "a rather direct realization" of a 60-year-old interpretation of quantum mechanics known as "many worlds," in which measuring photons and other environmental interactions split reality into alternate timelines.
In the case of SHG, two photons in the pump beam with a frequency Bp are converted by a nonlinear optical crystal into a single photon with a frequency 2bp when the phase matching (momentum conservation) condition is satisfied.
Thus the idea that cell tower photons could make you sick does not seem plausible to me.
Alice has sacrificed the two photons in her possession, but as a result, Bob now has an exact copy of the original photon, photon X.
It will be necessary if future generations of computers become reliant on photons instead of electrons.
The teleportation step involves the use of high-quality photon pairs on its own.
To keep from losing the photon pairs, the team built upon existing ideas of multiplexing, an approach that uses a series of light source systems comprising components common in fiber-optics.
The challenge is finding other light properties that can also be entangled, which would enable each photon to transmit more quantum information over large distances.
TEHRAN (FNA)- MPQ scientists can detect an optical photon twice.
Now, let s say you just want one atom and not more than one photon every time you turn on the light.
gamma]] = 1, photon emission in the dipole mode satisfies fully the conditions of angular momentum conservation which apply to the dominant radiationless branch.