photoelectron

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pho·to·e·lec·tron

(fō'tō-ē-lek'tron),
An electron freed by the action of light.

photoelectron

[-ilek′tron]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light + elektron, amber
any electron that is discharged when light strikes a metal surface.

photoelectron

(fō″tō-ē-lĕk′trŏn) [″ + elektron, amber]
An electron that is ejected from its orbit around the nucleus of an atom by interaction with a photon of energy (light, x-radiation, and so on).
References in periodicals archive ?
Photoelectron spectroscopy enables selective observation of valence electrons that play central roles in nonadiabatic transitions.
How are the photoelectron kinetic energy and angular distributions expressed?
Materials that possess an overlayer thickness greater than the photoelectron escape depth will not allow photoelectrons generated from the underlying material to escape to the surface and be detected.
Quantitative small spot spectroscopy mode: Acquisition of photoelectron spectra with excellent energy resolution from selected areas smaller than 5 [micro]m diameter is possible using a channeltron-based pulse counting detector with excellent bandwidth.
The first surface analysis technique, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, will be detailed in the February 2011 issue of CoatingsTech.
The discrepancy for electrons that backscatter with more than 50 % of their incident energy may be caused by these higher energy electrons having a greater probability of producing at least one photoelectron in a veto detector.
Another reason researchers formerly shunned taking measurements at several takeoff angles has to do with the fact that insulating samples acquire a net charge as photoelectrons leave them.
X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, sometimes also referred to as ESCA, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis) is a broadly applicable surface analysis technique that can detect all elements except hydrogen and helium without the use of standards.
X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the most commonly used technique for determining the chemical composition of surfaces.
If the sample is oriented so photoelectrons are detected as they leave the sample at a grazing angle along the surface, then these electrons most likely originated in atoms in the top atomic layer.
For common measurement conditions, the ratio of the EAL to the IMFP is approximately constant (within 3 %) for photoelectron emission angles up to 60[degrees].